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Survival of mammalian cells exposed to ultrahigh dose rates from a laser-produced plasma x-ray source

Tillman, Carl; Grafström, Gustav LU ; Jonsson, Ann-Charlotte; Jönsson, Bo-Anders LU ; Mercer, Ian; Mattsson, Sören LU ; Strand, Sven-Erik LU and Svanberg, Sune LU (1999) In Radiology 213(3). p.860-865
Abstract
PURPOSE: To determine whether intense laser-produced x rays have an increased radiation hazard. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Mammalian cells were exposed to x rays from a laser-produced plasma that produced ultrahigh peak absorbed dose rates, up to a factor of 10(10) higher than those produced by conventional x rays used in imaging. The cell survival was studied as a function of the absorbed dose. The survival of mammalian cells exposed to high peak absorbed dose rates with laser-produced x rays was compared with the survival of cells exposed to standard absorbed dose rates with conventional x-ray sources. Comparative survival studies were performed by using a conventional x-ray tube and a cobalt 60 source. The absorbed doses in the irradiation... (More)
PURPOSE: To determine whether intense laser-produced x rays have an increased radiation hazard. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Mammalian cells were exposed to x rays from a laser-produced plasma that produced ultrahigh peak absorbed dose rates, up to a factor of 10(10) higher than those produced by conventional x rays used in imaging. The cell survival was studied as a function of the absorbed dose. The survival of mammalian cells exposed to high peak absorbed dose rates with laser-produced x rays was compared with the survival of cells exposed to standard absorbed dose rates with conventional x-ray sources. Comparative survival studies were performed by using a conventional x-ray tube and a cobalt 60 source. The absorbed doses in the irradiation field were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters. RESULTS: Cell survival following irradiation by filtered, laser-produced x rays with a high dose rate was not markedly different from the survival following irradiation by conventional sources. There was, however, a notable difference between the survival after exposure to filtered, laser-produced x rays and the survival after exposure to unfiltered laser-produced x rays. CONCLUSION: Exposure to filtered, laser-produced x rays with a high dose rate does not lead to increased harm to mammalian cells exposed in vitro compared with the harm from exposure to x rays from conventional sources, which indicates that the use of high-power laser facilities for medical imaging is justified (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Radiology
volume
213
issue
3
pages
860 - 865
publisher
Radiological Society of North America
external identifiers
  • scopus:0344672620
ISSN
1527-1315
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
242270a1-cc66-4083-b1db-9cd51fa0f299 (old id 1116125)
alternative location
http://radiology.rsnajnls.org/cgi/content/full/213/3/860
date added to LUP
2008-07-10 09:29:49
date last changed
2017-08-13 04:16:16
@article{242270a1-cc66-4083-b1db-9cd51fa0f299,
  abstract     = {PURPOSE: To determine whether intense laser-produced x rays have an increased radiation hazard. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Mammalian cells were exposed to x rays from a laser-produced plasma that produced ultrahigh peak absorbed dose rates, up to a factor of 10(10) higher than those produced by conventional x rays used in imaging. The cell survival was studied as a function of the absorbed dose. The survival of mammalian cells exposed to high peak absorbed dose rates with laser-produced x rays was compared with the survival of cells exposed to standard absorbed dose rates with conventional x-ray sources. Comparative survival studies were performed by using a conventional x-ray tube and a cobalt 60 source. The absorbed doses in the irradiation field were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters. RESULTS: Cell survival following irradiation by filtered, laser-produced x rays with a high dose rate was not markedly different from the survival following irradiation by conventional sources. There was, however, a notable difference between the survival after exposure to filtered, laser-produced x rays and the survival after exposure to unfiltered laser-produced x rays. CONCLUSION: Exposure to filtered, laser-produced x rays with a high dose rate does not lead to increased harm to mammalian cells exposed in vitro compared with the harm from exposure to x rays from conventional sources, which indicates that the use of high-power laser facilities for medical imaging is justified},
  author       = {Tillman, Carl and Grafström, Gustav and Jonsson, Ann-Charlotte and Jönsson, Bo-Anders and Mercer, Ian and Mattsson, Sören and Strand, Sven-Erik and Svanberg, Sune},
  issn         = {1527-1315},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {860--865},
  publisher    = {Radiological Society of North America},
  series       = {Radiology},
  title        = {Survival of mammalian cells exposed to ultrahigh dose rates from a laser-produced plasma x-ray source},
  volume       = {213},
  year         = {1999},
}