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Fetal growth is not associated with early onset of severe retinopathy in type 1 diabetes mellitus

Agardh, Elisabet LU ; Herbst, Andreas LU ; Åberg, Anders E LU and Agardh, Carl-David LU (2000) In Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice 48(1). p.61-65
Abstract
Reduced fetal growth has been suggested as a possible risk factor for diabetic nephropathy. The aim of the present study was to examine whether there could be an association also with rapidly progressing severe retinopathy in younger type 1 diabetic patients. Maternal pregnancy, as well as birth parameters of 27 type 1 diabetic patients with severe retinopathy diagnosis at a median age of 25 years, were studied retrospectively. The control group consisted of 22 type 1 diabetic patients with mild background retinopathy and with similar age, age at onset, and duration of diabetes. Mothers of the subjects with severe retinopathy had a higher body mass index (P = 0.03) but similar age, blood pressure levels, and weight gain during pregnancy as... (More)
Reduced fetal growth has been suggested as a possible risk factor for diabetic nephropathy. The aim of the present study was to examine whether there could be an association also with rapidly progressing severe retinopathy in younger type 1 diabetic patients. Maternal pregnancy, as well as birth parameters of 27 type 1 diabetic patients with severe retinopathy diagnosis at a median age of 25 years, were studied retrospectively. The control group consisted of 22 type 1 diabetic patients with mild background retinopathy and with similar age, age at onset, and duration of diabetes. Mothers of the subjects with severe retinopathy had a higher body mass index (P = 0.03) but similar age, blood pressure levels, and weight gain during pregnancy as those of the control group. All but four babies, two in each group, were born after 37 completed gestational weeks. There were no differences regarding birth weight or of relative birth weight corrected for gestational length. Head circumference, birth length, and placenta weight were similar. The results indicate that fetal growth is not a factor of major importance for the development of severe retinopathy in younger type 1 diabetic patients. (Less)
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organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Birth weight, Fetal growth, Severe retinopathy, Type 1 diabetes
in
Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice
volume
48
issue
1
pages
61 - 65
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:10704702
  • scopus:0033995218
ISSN
1872-8227
DOI
10.1016/S0168-8227(99)00140-0
language
English
LU publication?
yes
additional info
The information about affiliations in this record was updated in December 2015. The record was previously connected to the following departments: Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (Lund) (013018000), Unit on Vascular Diabetic Complications (013241510)
id
47563ae5-e7ce-4c6f-a277-15a550fcaeb1 (old id 1116214)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 11:47:45
date last changed
2020-10-20 01:07:46
@article{47563ae5-e7ce-4c6f-a277-15a550fcaeb1,
  abstract     = {Reduced fetal growth has been suggested as a possible risk factor for diabetic nephropathy. The aim of the present study was to examine whether there could be an association also with rapidly progressing severe retinopathy in younger type 1 diabetic patients. Maternal pregnancy, as well as birth parameters of 27 type 1 diabetic patients with severe retinopathy diagnosis at a median age of 25 years, were studied retrospectively. The control group consisted of 22 type 1 diabetic patients with mild background retinopathy and with similar age, age at onset, and duration of diabetes. Mothers of the subjects with severe retinopathy had a higher body mass index (P = 0.03) but similar age, blood pressure levels, and weight gain during pregnancy as those of the control group. All but four babies, two in each group, were born after 37 completed gestational weeks. There were no differences regarding birth weight or of relative birth weight corrected for gestational length. Head circumference, birth length, and placenta weight were similar. The results indicate that fetal growth is not a factor of major importance for the development of severe retinopathy in younger type 1 diabetic patients.},
  author       = {Agardh, Elisabet and Herbst, Andreas and Åberg, Anders E and Agardh, Carl-David},
  issn         = {1872-8227},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {61--65},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice},
  title        = {Fetal growth is not associated with early onset of severe retinopathy in type 1 diabetes mellitus},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0168-8227(99)00140-0},
  doi          = {10.1016/S0168-8227(99)00140-0},
  volume       = {48},
  year         = {2000},
}