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What inner ear diseases cause benign paroxysmal positional vertigo?

Karlberg, Mikael LU ; Hall, K; Quickert, N; Hinson, J and Halmagyi, G M (2000) In Acta Oto-Laryngologica 120(3). p.380-385
Abstract
Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) originating from the posterior semicircular canal (pSCC) is a common vestibular disorder that is easy to diagnose and usually easy to treat. The majority of patients with BPPV have no known inner ear disease; they have "primary" or "idiopathic" BPPV. However, a minority does have objective evidence of an inner ear disease on the same side as the BPPV and this group has "secondary" or "symptomatic" BPPV. Previous publications differ on the prevalence of secondary BPPV and about the types of inner ear diseases capable of causing it. In order to determine what proportion of patients have secondary as opposed to primary BPPV and which inner ear diseases are capable of causing secondary BPPV, we... (More)
Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) originating from the posterior semicircular canal (pSCC) is a common vestibular disorder that is easy to diagnose and usually easy to treat. The majority of patients with BPPV have no known inner ear disease; they have "primary" or "idiopathic" BPPV. However, a minority does have objective evidence of an inner ear disease on the same side as the BPPV and this group has "secondary" or "symptomatic" BPPV. Previous publications differ on the prevalence of secondary BPPV and about the types of inner ear diseases capable of causing it. In order to determine what proportion of patients have secondary as opposed to primary BPPV and which inner ear diseases are capable of causing secondary BPPV, we searched our database for the 10-year period from 1988 to 1997 and found a total of 2847 patients with BPPV. Of these, 81 (3%) had definite pSCC-BPPV secondary to an ipsilateral inner ear disease. Sixteen had Meniere's disease, 24 had an acute unilateral peripheral vestibulopathy, 12 had a chronic unilateral peripheral vestibulopathy, 21 had chronic bilateral peripheral vestibulopathy and 8 had unilateral sensorineural hearing loss. It seems that any inner ear disease that detaches otoconia and yet does not totally destroy pSCC function can cause BPPV and that a case can be made for audiometry and caloric testing in all patients with BPPV. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
vestibular neuritis, vestibular test, positional vertigo, positional nystagmus, hearing loss, Menière's disease, audiometry
in
Acta Oto-Laryngologica
volume
120
issue
3
pages
380 - 385
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • pmid:10894413
  • scopus:0034580451
ISSN
1651-2251
DOI
10.1080/000164800750000603
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
76f6e299-ac31-4553-9350-0dca4db4d7ee (old id 1116530)
date added to LUP
2008-07-01 14:22:57
date last changed
2017-08-06 04:28:30
@article{76f6e299-ac31-4553-9350-0dca4db4d7ee,
  abstract     = {Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) originating from the posterior semicircular canal (pSCC) is a common vestibular disorder that is easy to diagnose and usually easy to treat. The majority of patients with BPPV have no known inner ear disease; they have "primary" or "idiopathic" BPPV. However, a minority does have objective evidence of an inner ear disease on the same side as the BPPV and this group has "secondary" or "symptomatic" BPPV. Previous publications differ on the prevalence of secondary BPPV and about the types of inner ear diseases capable of causing it. In order to determine what proportion of patients have secondary as opposed to primary BPPV and which inner ear diseases are capable of causing secondary BPPV, we searched our database for the 10-year period from 1988 to 1997 and found a total of 2847 patients with BPPV. Of these, 81 (3%) had definite pSCC-BPPV secondary to an ipsilateral inner ear disease. Sixteen had Meniere's disease, 24 had an acute unilateral peripheral vestibulopathy, 12 had a chronic unilateral peripheral vestibulopathy, 21 had chronic bilateral peripheral vestibulopathy and 8 had unilateral sensorineural hearing loss. It seems that any inner ear disease that detaches otoconia and yet does not totally destroy pSCC function can cause BPPV and that a case can be made for audiometry and caloric testing in all patients with BPPV.},
  author       = {Karlberg, Mikael and Hall, K and Quickert, N and Hinson, J and Halmagyi, G M},
  issn         = {1651-2251},
  keyword      = {vestibular neuritis,vestibular test,positional vertigo,positional nystagmus,hearing loss,Menière's disease,audiometry},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {380--385},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Acta Oto-Laryngologica},
  title        = {What inner ear diseases cause benign paroxysmal positional vertigo?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/000164800750000603},
  volume       = {120},
  year         = {2000},
}