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Granulocytic sarcomas in body cavities in childhood acute myeloid leukemias with 11q23/MLL rearrangements

Johansson, Bertil LU ; Fioretos, Thoas LU ; Kullendorff, Carl-Magnus LU ; Wiebe, Thomas LU ; Békássy, Albert LU ; Garwicz, Stanislaw LU ; Forestier, E; Roos, G; Åkerman, Måns LU and Mitelman, Felix LU , et al. (2000) In Genes, Chromosomes and Cancer 27(2). p.136-142
Abstract
Three childhood acute monoblastic leukemias (AML M5) with granulocytic sarcomas (GSs) are described. All displayed 11q23/MLL abnormalities, t(9;11)(p22;q23) in two cases and t(11;17)(q23;q21) in one case, constituting around 20% of all 11q23-positive AML cytogenetically investigated in our department. Two of the patients had GS in multiple locations, and all three had abdominal GS. In two of them, t(9;11)-positive GS was diagnosed prior to the diagnosis of AML. Fourteen (1.9%) of 752 published AML cases with 11q23 aberrations have had GS, either as a presenting feature or during disease progression. The incidence of GS has varied significantly (P < 0.05) between children (3.8%) and adults (0.8%). The most common AML subtype has been AML... (More)
Three childhood acute monoblastic leukemias (AML M5) with granulocytic sarcomas (GSs) are described. All displayed 11q23/MLL abnormalities, t(9;11)(p22;q23) in two cases and t(11;17)(q23;q21) in one case, constituting around 20% of all 11q23-positive AML cytogenetically investigated in our department. Two of the patients had GS in multiple locations, and all three had abdominal GS. In two of them, t(9;11)-positive GS was diagnosed prior to the diagnosis of AML. Fourteen (1.9%) of 752 published AML cases with 11q23 aberrations have had GS, either as a presenting feature or during disease progression. The incidence of GS has varied significantly (P < 0.05) between children (3.8%) and adults (0.8%). The most common AML subtype has been AML M5 ( approximately 75%) and the most frequent GS sites have been the skin, abdomen, orbit, and thorax. Considering the possibility of underreporting of GS in published cases and the relatively high frequency in our own series, we believe that 11q23/MLL rearrangements may predispose to GS development. Although extramedullary infiltrates in the skin are known to be frequent in cases of AML M5, which is often associated with 11q23 aberrations, the present findings indicate that GS in the abdomen, orbit, and thorax may also be common, especially in pediatric AML. Thus, the possibility of 11q23/MLL-positive GS should be suspected when tumors of uncertain derivation occur in these sites. Finally, the identification of 11q23/MLL abnormalities in GSs in two patients without overt AML underscores the importance of using cytogenetic and molecular genetic investigations as a diagnostic approach in the evaluation of tumorous lesions of unknown origin. (Less)
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Genes, Chromosomes and Cancer
volume
27
issue
2
pages
136 - 142
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • pmid:10612801
  • scopus:17544385040
ISSN
1045-2257
DOI
10.1002/(SICI)1098-2264(200002)27:2<136::AID-GCC4>3.0.CO;2-9
language
English
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yes
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6f9ccbe2-9be4-465b-b421-f665b33cb6dd (old id 1116546)
date added to LUP
2008-07-01 14:45:35
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2017-04-09 03:33:52
@article{6f9ccbe2-9be4-465b-b421-f665b33cb6dd,
  abstract     = {Three childhood acute monoblastic leukemias (AML M5) with granulocytic sarcomas (GSs) are described. All displayed 11q23/MLL abnormalities, t(9;11)(p22;q23) in two cases and t(11;17)(q23;q21) in one case, constituting around 20% of all 11q23-positive AML cytogenetically investigated in our department. Two of the patients had GS in multiple locations, and all three had abdominal GS. In two of them, t(9;11)-positive GS was diagnosed prior to the diagnosis of AML. Fourteen (1.9%) of 752 published AML cases with 11q23 aberrations have had GS, either as a presenting feature or during disease progression. The incidence of GS has varied significantly (P &lt; 0.05) between children (3.8%) and adults (0.8%). The most common AML subtype has been AML M5 ( approximately 75%) and the most frequent GS sites have been the skin, abdomen, orbit, and thorax. Considering the possibility of underreporting of GS in published cases and the relatively high frequency in our own series, we believe that 11q23/MLL rearrangements may predispose to GS development. Although extramedullary infiltrates in the skin are known to be frequent in cases of AML M5, which is often associated with 11q23 aberrations, the present findings indicate that GS in the abdomen, orbit, and thorax may also be common, especially in pediatric AML. Thus, the possibility of 11q23/MLL-positive GS should be suspected when tumors of uncertain derivation occur in these sites. Finally, the identification of 11q23/MLL abnormalities in GSs in two patients without overt AML underscores the importance of using cytogenetic and molecular genetic investigations as a diagnostic approach in the evaluation of tumorous lesions of unknown origin.},
  author       = {Johansson, Bertil and Fioretos, Thoas and Kullendorff, Carl-Magnus and Wiebe, Thomas and Békássy, Albert and Garwicz, Stanislaw and Forestier, E and Roos, G and Åkerman, Måns and Mitelman, Felix and Billstrom, Rolf},
  issn         = {1045-2257},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {136--142},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Genes, Chromosomes and Cancer},
  title        = {Granulocytic sarcomas in body cavities in childhood acute myeloid leukemias with 11q23/MLL rearrangements},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/(SICI)1098-2264(200002)27:2<136::AID-GCC4>3.0.CO;2-9},
  volume       = {27},
  year         = {2000},
}