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Effects of intraluminal trypsin and bile on the exocrine and endocrine pancreas after pancreaticobiliary diversion and biliodigestive shunt

Ohlsson, Bodil LU ; Yusa, Toru; Rehfeld, J F; Lundquist, Ingmar LU ; Ihse, Ingemar LU and Axelson, Jan LU (2000) In Pancreas 20(2). p.170-176
Abstract
Pancreaticobiliary diversion (PBD) and biliodigestive shunt (BDS) cause long-standing hypercholecystokininemia followed by pancreatic hyperplasia. These changes have been suggested to be due to the lack of intraluminal trypsin and bile, respectively, in the upper small intestine. The aim of these experiments was to study the effect of restoration of intraluminal trypsin and bile on plasma levels of cholecystokinin (CCK) and the changes found in exocrine and endocrine pancreas after PBD and BDS. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used. PBD was done in 16 rats, eight of which had trypsin dissolved in 50 mM sodium bicarbonate (SB), and eight had SB only by gastric intubation twice daily. BDS was done in another 16 rats, eight of which had bile... (More)
Pancreaticobiliary diversion (PBD) and biliodigestive shunt (BDS) cause long-standing hypercholecystokininemia followed by pancreatic hyperplasia. These changes have been suggested to be due to the lack of intraluminal trypsin and bile, respectively, in the upper small intestine. The aim of these experiments was to study the effect of restoration of intraluminal trypsin and bile on plasma levels of cholecystokinin (CCK) and the changes found in exocrine and endocrine pancreas after PBD and BDS. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used. PBD was done in 16 rats, eight of which had trypsin dissolved in 50 mM sodium bicarbonate (SB), and eight had SB only by gastric intubation twice daily. BDS was done in another 16 rats, eight of which had bile dissolved in SB, and eight had SB in a similar manner. Sham-operated rats had SB and served as controls. After 4 weeks, the rats were killed, and the concentrations of circulating CCK, gastrin, glucose, glucagon, and insulin were determined. The pancreas was removed, weighed, and analyzed for contents of water, protein, and DNA. In another study, PBD-operated rats got trypsin in varying dosages or trypsin and taurocholate in combination for 2 weeks before death. The concentrations of plasma CCK and glucagon were elevated after both PBD and BDS. PBD decreased the concentration of gastrin in plasma. PBD caused an increase of pancreatic weight and the contents of protein and DNA. Trypsin substitution to PBD-operated rats did not affect plasma CCK or glucagon levels, but the PBD-induced increases in weight and DNA content were counteracted by trypsin. Higher dosages of trypsin did not further influence the effects seen after PBD. Pancreatic weight and DNA content were increased after BDS. Bile administration completely abolished the increase in plasma CCK and glucagon, as well as the gain in pancreatic weight, and reduced the increase in pancreatic DNA. Substitution with bile to BDS-operated rats abolished the increase in the plasma levels of CCK and glucagon, as well as the trophic effects on the pancreas. Trypsin substitution to PBD-operated rats partly reversed the trophic effects on the pancreas but not the hormonal changes in plasma. Thus the trophic effects on the pancreas exerted by BDS seem to be dependent on the lack of bile in the upper small intestine, whereas the effects of PBD only partly are a consequence of the absence of intraluminal trypsin. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Pancreas
volume
20
issue
2
pages
170 - 176
publisher
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
external identifiers
  • pmid:10707933
  • scopus:0033994242
ISSN
0885-3177
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
88f14761-a6c7-4979-b109-712ad57c54a5 (old id 1117373)
date added to LUP
2008-06-27 14:37:31
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:22:12
@article{88f14761-a6c7-4979-b109-712ad57c54a5,
  abstract     = {Pancreaticobiliary diversion (PBD) and biliodigestive shunt (BDS) cause long-standing hypercholecystokininemia followed by pancreatic hyperplasia. These changes have been suggested to be due to the lack of intraluminal trypsin and bile, respectively, in the upper small intestine. The aim of these experiments was to study the effect of restoration of intraluminal trypsin and bile on plasma levels of cholecystokinin (CCK) and the changes found in exocrine and endocrine pancreas after PBD and BDS. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used. PBD was done in 16 rats, eight of which had trypsin dissolved in 50 mM sodium bicarbonate (SB), and eight had SB only by gastric intubation twice daily. BDS was done in another 16 rats, eight of which had bile dissolved in SB, and eight had SB in a similar manner. Sham-operated rats had SB and served as controls. After 4 weeks, the rats were killed, and the concentrations of circulating CCK, gastrin, glucose, glucagon, and insulin were determined. The pancreas was removed, weighed, and analyzed for contents of water, protein, and DNA. In another study, PBD-operated rats got trypsin in varying dosages or trypsin and taurocholate in combination for 2 weeks before death. The concentrations of plasma CCK and glucagon were elevated after both PBD and BDS. PBD decreased the concentration of gastrin in plasma. PBD caused an increase of pancreatic weight and the contents of protein and DNA. Trypsin substitution to PBD-operated rats did not affect plasma CCK or glucagon levels, but the PBD-induced increases in weight and DNA content were counteracted by trypsin. Higher dosages of trypsin did not further influence the effects seen after PBD. Pancreatic weight and DNA content were increased after BDS. Bile administration completely abolished the increase in plasma CCK and glucagon, as well as the gain in pancreatic weight, and reduced the increase in pancreatic DNA. Substitution with bile to BDS-operated rats abolished the increase in the plasma levels of CCK and glucagon, as well as the trophic effects on the pancreas. Trypsin substitution to PBD-operated rats partly reversed the trophic effects on the pancreas but not the hormonal changes in plasma. Thus the trophic effects on the pancreas exerted by BDS seem to be dependent on the lack of bile in the upper small intestine, whereas the effects of PBD only partly are a consequence of the absence of intraluminal trypsin.},
  author       = {Ohlsson, Bodil and Yusa, Toru and Rehfeld, J F and Lundquist, Ingmar and Ihse, Ingemar and Axelson, Jan},
  issn         = {0885-3177},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {170--176},
  publisher    = {Lippincott Williams & Wilkins},
  series       = {Pancreas},
  title        = {Effects of intraluminal trypsin and bile on the exocrine and endocrine pancreas after pancreaticobiliary diversion and biliodigestive shunt},
  volume       = {20},
  year         = {2000},
}