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Children's consent to treatment: using a scale to assess degree of self-determination

Runeson, I; Elander, G; Hermerén, Göran LU and Hallström, Inger LU (2000) In Pediatric nursing 26(5). p.455-455
Abstract
Discussion and debate regarding decision-making that is 'in the best interest of the child' and that also considers the child's voice in these decisions have increased in recent years. A study was undertaken to identify everyday situations in medical and nursing care in which children had been allowed to have a voice or been denied the right. Twenty-six hospitalized children, ages 6 to 17 years, and 21 parents were interviewed concerning their experiences with hospitalization. The interviews contained examples of 100 situations in which the children could have had a say in decisions concerning their care and treatment. An instrument describing five levels of self-determination was used to analyze the situations. The results showed that... (More)
Discussion and debate regarding decision-making that is 'in the best interest of the child' and that also considers the child's voice in these decisions have increased in recent years. A study was undertaken to identify everyday situations in medical and nursing care in which children had been allowed to have a voice or been denied the right. Twenty-six hospitalized children, ages 6 to 17 years, and 21 parents were interviewed concerning their experiences with hospitalization. The interviews contained examples of 100 situations in which the children could have had a say in decisions concerning their care and treatment. An instrument describing five levels of self-determination was used to analyze the situations. The results showed that there are situations in the daily care of children who are hospitalized where it is possible to discuss the degree of self-determination of the child. To different degrees, staff members honored children's choices in questions concerning their own health. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Pediatric nursing
volume
26
issue
5
pages
455 - 455
publisher
Jannetti Publications
external identifiers
  • pmid:12026334
ISSN
0097-9805
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8e55bd1d-027e-4b32-847f-1dc35031d41b (old id 1117508)
date added to LUP
2008-06-27 13:33:43
date last changed
2016-04-16 03:15:56
@article{8e55bd1d-027e-4b32-847f-1dc35031d41b,
  abstract     = {Discussion and debate regarding decision-making that is 'in the best interest of the child' and that also considers the child's voice in these decisions have increased in recent years. A study was undertaken to identify everyday situations in medical and nursing care in which children had been allowed to have a voice or been denied the right. Twenty-six hospitalized children, ages 6 to 17 years, and 21 parents were interviewed concerning their experiences with hospitalization. The interviews contained examples of 100 situations in which the children could have had a say in decisions concerning their care and treatment. An instrument describing five levels of self-determination was used to analyze the situations. The results showed that there are situations in the daily care of children who are hospitalized where it is possible to discuss the degree of self-determination of the child. To different degrees, staff members honored children's choices in questions concerning their own health.},
  author       = {Runeson, I and Elander, G and Hermerén, Göran and Hallström, Inger},
  issn         = {0097-9805},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {455--455},
  publisher    = {Jannetti Publications},
  series       = {Pediatric nursing},
  title        = {Children's consent to treatment: using a scale to assess degree of self-determination},
  volume       = {26},
  year         = {2000},
}