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Brain plasticity and stroke rehabilitation. The Willis lecture

Johansson, Barbro LU (2000) In Stroke: a journal of cerebral circulation 31(1). p.223-230
Abstract
Neuronal connections and cortical maps are continuously remodeled by our experience. Knowledge of the potential capabilityof the brain to compensate for lesions is a prerequisite for optimal stroke rehabilitation strategies. Experimental focal cortical lesions induce changes in adjacent cortex and in the contralateral hemisphere. Neuroimaging studies in stroke patients indicate altered poststroke activation patterns, which suggest some functional reorganization. To what extent functional imaging data correspond to outcome data needs to be evaluated. Reorganization may be the principle process responsible for recovery of function after stroke, but what are the limits, and to what extent can postischemic intervention facilitate such changes?... (More)
Neuronal connections and cortical maps are continuously remodeled by our experience. Knowledge of the potential capabilityof the brain to compensate for lesions is a prerequisite for optimal stroke rehabilitation strategies. Experimental focal cortical lesions induce changes in adjacent cortex and in the contralateral hemisphere. Neuroimaging studies in stroke patients indicate altered poststroke activation patterns, which suggest some functional reorganization. To what extent functional imaging data correspond to outcome data needs to be evaluated. Reorganization may be the principle process responsible for recovery of function after stroke, but what are the limits, and to what extent can postischemic intervention facilitate such changes? Postoperative housing of animals in an enriched environment can significantly enhance functional outcome and can also interact with other interventions, including neocortical grafting. What role will neuronal progenitor cells play in future rehabilitation-stimulated in situ or as neural replacement? And what is the future for blocking neural growth inhibitory factors? Better knowledge of postischemic molecular and neurophysiological events, and close interaction between basic and applied research, will hopefully enable us to design rehabilitation strategies based on neurobiological principles in a not-too-distant future. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Stroke: a journal of cerebral circulation
volume
31
issue
1
pages
223 - 230
publisher
American Heart Association
external identifiers
  • pmid:10625741
  • scopus:0033958424
ISSN
1524-4628
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
989737ac-b89a-47ab-b73f-ee6ef82e0b36 (old id 1117688)
alternative location
http://stroke.ahajournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/31/1/223
date added to LUP
2008-06-26 15:28:30
date last changed
2017-08-06 04:30:03
@article{989737ac-b89a-47ab-b73f-ee6ef82e0b36,
  abstract     = {Neuronal connections and cortical maps are continuously remodeled by our experience. Knowledge of the potential capabilityof the brain to compensate for lesions is a prerequisite for optimal stroke rehabilitation strategies. Experimental focal cortical lesions induce changes in adjacent cortex and in the contralateral hemisphere. Neuroimaging studies in stroke patients indicate altered poststroke activation patterns, which suggest some functional reorganization. To what extent functional imaging data correspond to outcome data needs to be evaluated. Reorganization may be the principle process responsible for recovery of function after stroke, but what are the limits, and to what extent can postischemic intervention facilitate such changes? Postoperative housing of animals in an enriched environment can significantly enhance functional outcome and can also interact with other interventions, including neocortical grafting. What role will neuronal progenitor cells play in future rehabilitation-stimulated in situ or as neural replacement? And what is the future for blocking neural growth inhibitory factors? Better knowledge of postischemic molecular and neurophysiological events, and close interaction between basic and applied research, will hopefully enable us to design rehabilitation strategies based on neurobiological principles in a not-too-distant future.},
  author       = {Johansson, Barbro},
  issn         = {1524-4628},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {223--230},
  publisher    = {American Heart Association},
  series       = { Stroke: a journal of cerebral circulation},
  title        = {Brain plasticity and stroke rehabilitation. The Willis lecture},
  volume       = {31},
  year         = {2000},
}