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Influence of microbial species on small intestinal myoelectric activity and transit in germ-free rats

Husebye, Einar; Hellstrom, Per M.; Sundler, Frank LU ; Chen, Jie and Midtvedt, Tore (2001) In American Journal of Physiology: Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology 280(3). p.368-380
Abstract
The effect of an intestinal microflora consisting of selected microbial species on myoelectric activity of small intestine was studied using germ-free rat models, with recording before and after specific intestinal colonization, in the unanesthetized state. Intestinal transit, neuropeptides in blood (RIA), and neuromessengers in the intestinal wall were determined. Clostridium tabificum vp 04 promoted regular spike burst activity, shown by a reduction of the migrating myoelectric complex (MMC) period from 30.5 +/- 3.9 min in the germ-free state to 21.2 +/- 0.14 min (P< 0.01). Lactobacillus acidophilus A10 and Bifidobacterium bifidum B11 reduced the MMC period from 27.9 +/- 4.5 to 21.5 +/- 2.1 min (P< 0.02) and accelerated small... (More)
The effect of an intestinal microflora consisting of selected microbial species on myoelectric activity of small intestine was studied using germ-free rat models, with recording before and after specific intestinal colonization, in the unanesthetized state. Intestinal transit, neuropeptides in blood (RIA), and neuromessengers in the intestinal wall were determined. Clostridium tabificum vp 04 promoted regular spike burst activity, shown by a reduction of the migrating myoelectric complex (MMC) period from 30.5 +/- 3.9 min in the germ-free state to 21.2 +/- 0.14 min (P< 0.01). Lactobacillus acidophilus A10 and Bifidobacterium bifidum B11 reduced the MMC period from 27.9 +/- 4.5 to 21.5 +/- 2.1 min (P< 0.02) and accelerated small intestinal transit (P< 0.05). Micrococcus luteus showed an inhibitory effect, with an MMC period of 35.9 +/- 9.3 min compared with 27.7 +/- 6.3 min in germ-free rats (P< 0.01). Inhibition was indicated also for Escherichia coli X7 gnotobiotic rats. No consistent changes in slow wave frequency were observed. The concentration of neuropeptide Y in blood decreased after introduction of conventional intestinal microflora, suggesting reduced inhibitory control. Intestinal bacteria promote or suppress the initiation and aboral migration of the MMC depending on the species involved. Bacteria with primitive fermenting metabolism (anaerobes) emerge as important promoters of regular spike burst activity in small intestine. (Less)
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Contribution to journal
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published
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in
American Journal of Physiology: Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology
volume
280
issue
3
pages
368 - 380
publisher
American Physiological Society
external identifiers
  • wos:000166917800008
  • scopus:0035006468
ISSN
1522-1547
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b398f444-2dba-4245-8e24-cf32d84d41f3 (old id 1119607)
alternative location
http://ajpgi.physiology.org/cgi/content/abstract/280/3/G368
date added to LUP
2008-06-30 15:49:31
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2018-04-08 03:35:21
@article{b398f444-2dba-4245-8e24-cf32d84d41f3,
  abstract     = {The effect of an intestinal microflora consisting of selected microbial species on myoelectric activity of small intestine was studied using germ-free rat models, with recording before and after specific intestinal colonization, in the unanesthetized state. Intestinal transit, neuropeptides in blood (RIA), and neuromessengers in the intestinal wall were determined. Clostridium tabificum vp 04 promoted regular spike burst activity, shown by a reduction of the migrating myoelectric complex (MMC) period from 30.5 +/- 3.9 min in the germ-free state to 21.2 +/- 0.14 min (P&lt; 0.01). Lactobacillus acidophilus A10 and Bifidobacterium bifidum B11 reduced the MMC period from 27.9 +/- 4.5 to 21.5 +/- 2.1 min (P&lt; 0.02) and accelerated small intestinal transit (P&lt; 0.05). Micrococcus luteus showed an inhibitory effect, with an MMC period of 35.9 +/- 9.3 min compared with 27.7 +/- 6.3 min in germ-free rats (P&lt; 0.01). Inhibition was indicated also for Escherichia coli X7 gnotobiotic rats. No consistent changes in slow wave frequency were observed. The concentration of neuropeptide Y in blood decreased after introduction of conventional intestinal microflora, suggesting reduced inhibitory control. Intestinal bacteria promote or suppress the initiation and aboral migration of the MMC depending on the species involved. Bacteria with primitive fermenting metabolism (anaerobes) emerge as important promoters of regular spike burst activity in small intestine.},
  author       = {Husebye, Einar and Hellstrom, Per M. and Sundler, Frank and Chen, Jie and Midtvedt, Tore},
  issn         = {1522-1547},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {368--380},
  publisher    = {American Physiological Society},
  series       = {American Journal of Physiology: Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology},
  title        = {Influence of microbial species on small intestinal myoelectric activity and transit in germ-free rats},
  volume       = {280},
  year         = {2001},
}