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CSF studies in violent offenders. II. Blood-brain barrier dysfunction without concurrent inflammation or structure degeneration

Anckarsäter, Henrik LU ; Blennow, Kaj LU ; Manhem, A. and Forsman, A (2001) In Journal of Neural Transmission 108(7). p.879-886
Abstract
Cerebral dysfunction without corresponding structural pathology has been reported in brain imaging studies of violent offenders. Biochemical markers in the CSF reflect various types of CNS pathology, such as blood-brain barrier dysfunction (CSF/S albumin ratio), infectious or inflammatory processes (IgG and IgM indices), neuronal or axonal degeneration (CSF-tau protein) and synaptic de- or regeneration (CSF-growth associated protein-43 (GAP-43)). We compared these CSF markers in 19 non-psychotic perpetrators of severe violent crimes undergoing pretrial forensic psychiatric investigation and 19 age- and sex-matched controls. Index subjects had significantly higher albumin ratios (p = 0.002), indicating abnormal vascular permeability as part... (More)
Cerebral dysfunction without corresponding structural pathology has been reported in brain imaging studies of violent offenders. Biochemical markers in the CSF reflect various types of CNS pathology, such as blood-brain barrier dysfunction (CSF/S albumin ratio), infectious or inflammatory processes (IgG and IgM indices), neuronal or axonal degeneration (CSF-tau protein) and synaptic de- or regeneration (CSF-growth associated protein-43 (GAP-43)). We compared these CSF markers in 19 non-psychotic perpetrators of severe violent crimes undergoing pretrial forensic psychiatric investigation and 19 age- and sex-matched controls. Index subjects had significantly higher albumin ratios (p = 0.002), indicating abnormal vascular permeability as part of the complex CNS dysfunction previously reported in violent offenders. Axis I disorders, including substance abuse or current medication, did not explain this finding. Since Ig-indices, CSF-tau protein or CSF-GAP-43 were not increased, there was no support for inflammation or neuronal/synaptic degeneration as etiological factors to CNS dysfunction in this category of subjects. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Violence, offenders, blood-brain barrier, tau-protein, GAP-43
in
Journal of Neural Transmission
volume
108
issue
7
pages
879 - 886
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • pmid:11515753
  • scopus:0034914640
ISSN
0300-9564
DOI
10.1007/s007020170037
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
759fe1a8-e1a4-4227-abb9-6bfebe49e8d9 (old id 1120698)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11515753
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs007020170037
date added to LUP
2013-10-09 14:05:44
date last changed
2018-05-29 11:07:44
@article{759fe1a8-e1a4-4227-abb9-6bfebe49e8d9,
  abstract     = {Cerebral dysfunction without corresponding structural pathology has been reported in brain imaging studies of violent offenders. Biochemical markers in the CSF reflect various types of CNS pathology, such as blood-brain barrier dysfunction (CSF/S albumin ratio), infectious or inflammatory processes (IgG and IgM indices), neuronal or axonal degeneration (CSF-tau protein) and synaptic de- or regeneration (CSF-growth associated protein-43 (GAP-43)). We compared these CSF markers in 19 non-psychotic perpetrators of severe violent crimes undergoing pretrial forensic psychiatric investigation and 19 age- and sex-matched controls. Index subjects had significantly higher albumin ratios (p = 0.002), indicating abnormal vascular permeability as part of the complex CNS dysfunction previously reported in violent offenders. Axis I disorders, including substance abuse or current medication, did not explain this finding. Since Ig-indices, CSF-tau protein or CSF-GAP-43 were not increased, there was no support for inflammation or neuronal/synaptic degeneration as etiological factors to CNS dysfunction in this category of subjects.},
  author       = {Anckarsäter, Henrik and Blennow, Kaj and Manhem, A. and Forsman, A},
  issn         = {0300-9564},
  keyword      = {Violence,offenders,blood-brain barrier,tau-protein,GAP-43},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {879--886},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Journal of Neural Transmission},
  title        = {CSF studies in violent offenders. II. Blood-brain barrier dysfunction without concurrent inflammation or structure degeneration},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s007020170037},
  volume       = {108},
  year         = {2001},
}