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Identification and localization of retinal cystatin C

Wasselius, Johan LU ; Håkansson, Katarina LU ; Johansson, Kjell LU ; Abrahamson, Magnus LU and Ehinger, Berndt LU (2001) In Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science 42(8). p.1901-1906
Abstract
PURPOSE. Cystatin C is a mammalian cysteine protease inhibitor, synthesized in various amounts by many kinds of cells and appearing in most body fluids. There are reports that it may be synthesized in the mammalian retina and that a cysteine protease inhibitor may influence the degradation of photoreceptor outer segment proteins. In the current study cystatin C was identified, quantitated, and localized in mouse, rat, and human retinas. METHODS. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), DNA sequencing, Western blot analysis, and immunohistochemistry have been used on mouse, rat, and human retinas (pigment epithelium included). RESULTS. Cystatin C is present in high concentrations... (More)
PURPOSE. Cystatin C is a mammalian cysteine protease inhibitor, synthesized in various amounts by many kinds of cells and appearing in most body fluids. There are reports that it may be synthesized in the mammalian retina and that a cysteine protease inhibitor may influence the degradation of photoreceptor outer segment proteins. In the current study cystatin C was identified, quantitated, and localized in mouse, rat, and human retinas. METHODS. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), DNA sequencing, Western blot analysis, and immunohistochemistry have been used on mouse, rat, and human retinas (pigment epithelium included). RESULTS. Cystatin C is present in high concentrations in the normal adult rat retina, as it is throughout its postnatal development. Its concentration increases to a peak at the time when rat pups open their eyes and then remains at a high level. It is mainly localized to the pigment epithelium, but also to some few neurons of varying types in the inner retina. Cystatin C is similarly expressed in normal mouse and human retinas. CONCLUSIONS. Cystatin C was identified and the localization described in the retinas of rat, mouse, and human using several techniques. Cystatin C is known to efficiently inactivate certain cysteine proteases. One of them, cathepsin S, is present in the retinal pigment epithelium and affects the proteolytic processing by cathepsin D of diurnally shed photoreceptor outer segments. Hypothetically, it appears possible that retinal cystatin C, given its localization to the pigment epithelium and its ability to inhibit cathepsin S, could be involved in the regulation of photoreceptor degradation. (Less)
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Contribution to journal
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published
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in
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science
volume
42
issue
8
pages
1901 - 1906
publisher
ASSOC RESEARCH VISION OPHTHALMOLOGY INC
external identifiers
  • pmid:11431459
  • scopus:0034934606
ISSN
1552-5783
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
fe11792a-c9f1-46d4-9663-0dbd3f6afa9f (old id 1120822)
alternative location
http://www.iovs.org/cgi/content/full/42/8/1901
date added to LUP
2008-07-17 11:14:02
date last changed
2018-01-07 08:43:16
@article{fe11792a-c9f1-46d4-9663-0dbd3f6afa9f,
  abstract     = {PURPOSE. Cystatin C is a mammalian cysteine protease inhibitor, synthesized in various amounts by many kinds of cells and appearing in most body fluids. There are reports that it may be synthesized in the mammalian retina and that a cysteine protease inhibitor may influence the degradation of photoreceptor outer segment proteins. In the current study cystatin C was identified, quantitated, and localized in mouse, rat, and human retinas. METHODS. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), DNA sequencing, Western blot analysis, and immunohistochemistry have been used on mouse, rat, and human retinas (pigment epithelium included). RESULTS. Cystatin C is present in high concentrations in the normal adult rat retina, as it is throughout its postnatal development. Its concentration increases to a peak at the time when rat pups open their eyes and then remains at a high level. It is mainly localized to the pigment epithelium, but also to some few neurons of varying types in the inner retina. Cystatin C is similarly expressed in normal mouse and human retinas. CONCLUSIONS. Cystatin C was identified and the localization described in the retinas of rat, mouse, and human using several techniques. Cystatin C is known to efficiently inactivate certain cysteine proteases. One of them, cathepsin S, is present in the retinal pigment epithelium and affects the proteolytic processing by cathepsin D of diurnally shed photoreceptor outer segments. Hypothetically, it appears possible that retinal cystatin C, given its localization to the pigment epithelium and its ability to inhibit cathepsin S, could be involved in the regulation of photoreceptor degradation.},
  author       = {Wasselius, Johan and Håkansson, Katarina and Johansson, Kjell and Abrahamson, Magnus and Ehinger, Berndt},
  issn         = {1552-5783},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {1901--1906},
  publisher    = {ASSOC RESEARCH VISION OPHTHALMOLOGY INC},
  series       = {Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science},
  title        = {Identification and localization of retinal cystatin C},
  volume       = {42},
  year         = {2001},
}