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Effects of superimposed electrical stimulation on perceived discomfort and torque increment size and variability.

Miller, Michael LU ; Downham, David and Lexell, Jan LU (2003) In Muscle and Nerve 27(1). p.90-98
Abstract
Superimposed electrical stimulation techniques can be used to detect central activation failure (CAF), that is, incomplete central nervous system recruitment or suboptimal activation of motor units. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of two stimulation parameters on perceived discomfort and torque increment size and variability. Discomfort was evaluated using a visual analog scale (0-100 mm) for pain. The rectus femoris muscle of the dominant leg of 24 young healthy men was stimulated during submaximal (80% maximal) voluntary contractions. The size and variability of torque increments and perceived discomfort were assessed following stimulation with: (1) pulse trains (100 HZ, 150 V, 0.2-ms pulse duration) of different... (More)
Superimposed electrical stimulation techniques can be used to detect central activation failure (CAF), that is, incomplete central nervous system recruitment or suboptimal activation of motor units. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of two stimulation parameters on perceived discomfort and torque increment size and variability. Discomfort was evaluated using a visual analog scale (0-100 mm) for pain. The rectus femoris muscle of the dominant leg of 24 young healthy men was stimulated during submaximal (80% maximal) voluntary contractions. The size and variability of torque increments and perceived discomfort were assessed following stimulation with: (1) pulse trains (100 HZ, 150 V, 0.2-ms pulse duration) of different lengths (50 ms and 100 ms); and (2) pulse trains (100 HZ, 100 ms, 150 V) with different pulse durations (0.2 ms and 0.1 ms). Pulse trains of 100 ms generated larger torque increments and produced less variability, but caused more discomfort than pulse trains of 50 ms. Average discomfort ratings for pulse trains of 100 ms were 43.1 mm, and of 50 ms were 53.2 mm. There was no difference in torque increment size or in variability between pulse trains with pulse durations of 0.1 ms and 0.2 ms, whereas discomfort was less for the shorter pulse durations; average discomfort ratings were 53.1 mm and 58.1 mm for pulse durations of 0.1 ms and 0.2 ms, respectively. Thus, the appropriate selection of stimulation parameters can reduce discomfort but maintain the ability to detect CAF. Muscle Nerve 27: 90-98, 2003 (Less)
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organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Torque, Perception, Support, Non-U.S. Gov't, Pain Measurement, Skeletal: physiology, Pain: diagnosis, Pain: physiopathology, Skeletal: innervation, Electric Stimulation: methods, Muscle, Adult, Human, Isometric Contraction: physiology, Knee Joint: physiology, Male, Motor Neurons: physiology
in
Muscle and Nerve
volume
27
issue
1
pages
90 - 98
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • wos:000180200300012
  • pmid:12508300
  • scopus:0037231333
ISSN
0148-639X
DOI
10.1002/mus.10289
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1807783d-4fd3-44f1-b0fb-6dc57dc6a684 (old id 112101)
date added to LUP
2007-07-24 10:42:35
date last changed
2018-01-07 06:03:46
@article{1807783d-4fd3-44f1-b0fb-6dc57dc6a684,
  abstract     = {Superimposed electrical stimulation techniques can be used to detect central activation failure (CAF), that is, incomplete central nervous system recruitment or suboptimal activation of motor units. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of two stimulation parameters on perceived discomfort and torque increment size and variability. Discomfort was evaluated using a visual analog scale (0-100 mm) for pain. The rectus femoris muscle of the dominant leg of 24 young healthy men was stimulated during submaximal (80% maximal) voluntary contractions. The size and variability of torque increments and perceived discomfort were assessed following stimulation with: (1) pulse trains (100 HZ, 150 V, 0.2-ms pulse duration) of different lengths (50 ms and 100 ms); and (2) pulse trains (100 HZ, 100 ms, 150 V) with different pulse durations (0.2 ms and 0.1 ms). Pulse trains of 100 ms generated larger torque increments and produced less variability, but caused more discomfort than pulse trains of 50 ms. Average discomfort ratings for pulse trains of 100 ms were 43.1 mm, and of 50 ms were 53.2 mm. There was no difference in torque increment size or in variability between pulse trains with pulse durations of 0.1 ms and 0.2 ms, whereas discomfort was less for the shorter pulse durations; average discomfort ratings were 53.1 mm and 58.1 mm for pulse durations of 0.1 ms and 0.2 ms, respectively. Thus, the appropriate selection of stimulation parameters can reduce discomfort but maintain the ability to detect CAF. Muscle Nerve 27: 90-98, 2003},
  author       = {Miller, Michael and Downham, David and Lexell, Jan},
  issn         = {0148-639X},
  keyword      = {Torque,Perception,Support,Non-U.S. Gov't,Pain Measurement,Skeletal: physiology,Pain: diagnosis,Pain: physiopathology,Skeletal: innervation,Electric Stimulation: methods,Muscle,Adult,Human,Isometric Contraction: physiology,Knee Joint: physiology,Male,Motor Neurons: physiology},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {90--98},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Muscle and Nerve},
  title        = {Effects of superimposed electrical stimulation on perceived discomfort and torque increment size and variability.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mus.10289},
  volume       = {27},
  year         = {2003},
}