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Ethnic differences in daily smoking in Malmö, Sweden. Varying influence of psychosocial and economic factors.

Lindström, Martin LU and Sundquist, Jan (2002) In European Journal of Public Health 12(4). p.287-294
Abstract
Background: The aim was to investigate ethnic differences in daily smoking in Malmö, Sweden, and whether these differences could be explained by psychosocial and economic conditions. Methods: The public health survey in Malmö 1994 is a cross-sectional study. A total of 5,600 individuals aged 20–80 years were randomly chosen to respond to a postal questionnaire. The participation rate was 71%. The study population was divided into seven categories according to country of birth; Sweden, Denmark/Norway, other Western countries, former Yugoslavia, Poland, Arabic-speaking countries and all other countries. A multivariate analysis was performed using a logistic regression model in order to investigate the importance of possible confounders on... (More)
Background: The aim was to investigate ethnic differences in daily smoking in Malmö, Sweden, and whether these differences could be explained by psychosocial and economic conditions. Methods: The public health survey in Malmö 1994 is a cross-sectional study. A total of 5,600 individuals aged 20–80 years were randomly chosen to respond to a postal questionnaire. The participation rate was 71%. The study population was divided into seven categories according to country of birth; Sweden, Denmark/Norway, other Western countries, former Yugoslavia, Poland, Arabic-speaking countries and all other countries. A multivariate analysis was performed using a logistic regression model in order to investigate the importance of possible confounders on the ethnic differences in daily smoking. Finally, variables measuring social network, social support and economic conditions were introduced. Results: The prevalence of daily smoking was significantly higher among both men and women born in Denmark/Norway (39.1% and 37.0%), men born in other Western countries (32.9%), Poland (34.0%) and Arabic-speaking countries (36.4%) than among Swedish men (21.7%) and women (23.8%). Women born in Arabic-speaking countries had a significantly lower smoking prevalence (7.1%). The multivariate analysis, including age, education and snuff, did not affect these results. A reduction of the odds ratio of daily smoking was observed for men born in Arabic-speaking countries and Poland after the introduction of the psychosocial and economic factors in the model. Only small changes were observed for women. Conclusion: There were significant ethnic group differences in daily smoking. Psychosocial and economic conditions in Sweden may be of importance in some ethnic groups. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
psychosocial factor, daily smoking, economic factor, ethnic
in
European Journal of Public Health
volume
12
issue
4
pages
287 - 294
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000179952100009
  • pmid:12506504
  • scopus:0036909324
ISSN
1101-1262
DOI
10.1093/eurpub/12.4.287
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8778ba12-7673-48ae-93f5-f9199af2a21f (old id 112118)
date added to LUP
2007-07-24 15:38:37
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:28:30
@article{8778ba12-7673-48ae-93f5-f9199af2a21f,
  abstract     = {Background: The aim was to investigate ethnic differences in daily smoking in Malmö, Sweden, and whether these differences could be explained by psychosocial and economic conditions. Methods: The public health survey in Malmö 1994 is a cross-sectional study. A total of 5,600 individuals aged 20–80 years were randomly chosen to respond to a postal questionnaire. The participation rate was 71%. The study population was divided into seven categories according to country of birth; Sweden, Denmark/Norway, other Western countries, former Yugoslavia, Poland, Arabic-speaking countries and all other countries. A multivariate analysis was performed using a logistic regression model in order to investigate the importance of possible confounders on the ethnic differences in daily smoking. Finally, variables measuring social network, social support and economic conditions were introduced. Results: The prevalence of daily smoking was significantly higher among both men and women born in Denmark/Norway (39.1% and 37.0%), men born in other Western countries (32.9%), Poland (34.0%) and Arabic-speaking countries (36.4%) than among Swedish men (21.7%) and women (23.8%). Women born in Arabic-speaking countries had a significantly lower smoking prevalence (7.1%). The multivariate analysis, including age, education and snuff, did not affect these results. A reduction of the odds ratio of daily smoking was observed for men born in Arabic-speaking countries and Poland after the introduction of the psychosocial and economic factors in the model. Only small changes were observed for women. Conclusion: There were significant ethnic group differences in daily smoking. Psychosocial and economic conditions in Sweden may be of importance in some ethnic groups.},
  author       = {Lindström, Martin and Sundquist, Jan},
  issn         = {1101-1262},
  keyword      = {psychosocial factor,daily smoking,economic factor,ethnic},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {287--294},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  series       = {European Journal of Public Health},
  title        = {Ethnic differences in daily smoking in Malmö, Sweden. Varying influence of psychosocial and economic factors.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/eurpub/12.4.287},
  volume       = {12},
  year         = {2002},
}