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The impact of long-term moderate physical activity on functional performance, bone mineral density and fracture incidence in elderly women

Ringsberg, Karin A.M.; Gärdsell, Per; Johnell, Olof LU ; Josefsson, Per-Olof and Obrant, Karl LU (2001) In Gerontology 47(1). p.15-20
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Earlier studies have shown that physical exercise and a higher workload increase muscle strength and improve gait and balance at all ages for both sexes. Published studies have, so far, failed to investigate the functional performance of elderly individuals concerning their long-term physical activity and variables of daily living. OBJECTIVE: To compare elderly women who participate in long-term, moderate exercise programmes with two age-matched groups of women from an urban and a rural community. METHODS: All participants answered a questionnaire about health, social circumstances and fractures. We measured the vibration threshold of the lower extremities, bone mineral density of the distal radius and functional performance... (More)
BACKGROUND: Earlier studies have shown that physical exercise and a higher workload increase muscle strength and improve gait and balance at all ages for both sexes. Published studies have, so far, failed to investigate the functional performance of elderly individuals concerning their long-term physical activity and variables of daily living. OBJECTIVE: To compare elderly women who participate in long-term, moderate exercise programmes with two age-matched groups of women from an urban and a rural community. METHODS: All participants answered a questionnaire about health, social circumstances and fractures. We measured the vibration threshold of the lower extremities, bone mineral density of the distal radius and functional performance such as muscle strength, balance and gait. RESULTS: The elderly, active groups performed significantly better in all functional tests and had sustained fewer fractures than the urban control group. When the comparison was made with the rural control group the differences were less obvious. The active group rated their health as better than both the control groups. CONCLUSION: Elderly women, who continue with moderate exercise programmes over many years, sustain fewer fractures and have better muscle strength, balance, gait and health ratings than women in general. Whether this is the result of the exercise or inherited characters, remains to be proved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Physical activity, Fractures, Balance, Elderly, Muscle strength, Bone mass
in
Gerontology
volume
47
issue
1
pages
15 - 20
publisher
Karger
external identifiers
  • pmid:11244287
  • scopus:0035099562
ISSN
1423-0003
DOI
10.1159/000052765
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
3b54db4d-6b9e-49d4-a0c9-5d5f3a242e86 (old id 1121553)
date added to LUP
2008-07-11 14:15:57
date last changed
2018-05-29 11:43:00
@article{3b54db4d-6b9e-49d4-a0c9-5d5f3a242e86,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: Earlier studies have shown that physical exercise and a higher workload increase muscle strength and improve gait and balance at all ages for both sexes. Published studies have, so far, failed to investigate the functional performance of elderly individuals concerning their long-term physical activity and variables of daily living. OBJECTIVE: To compare elderly women who participate in long-term, moderate exercise programmes with two age-matched groups of women from an urban and a rural community. METHODS: All participants answered a questionnaire about health, social circumstances and fractures. We measured the vibration threshold of the lower extremities, bone mineral density of the distal radius and functional performance such as muscle strength, balance and gait. RESULTS: The elderly, active groups performed significantly better in all functional tests and had sustained fewer fractures than the urban control group. When the comparison was made with the rural control group the differences were less obvious. The active group rated their health as better than both the control groups. CONCLUSION: Elderly women, who continue with moderate exercise programmes over many years, sustain fewer fractures and have better muscle strength, balance, gait and health ratings than women in general. Whether this is the result of the exercise or inherited characters, remains to be proved.},
  author       = {Ringsberg, Karin A.M. and Gärdsell, Per and Johnell, Olof and Josefsson, Per-Olof and Obrant, Karl},
  issn         = {1423-0003},
  keyword      = {Physical activity,Fractures,Balance,Elderly,Muscle strength,Bone mass},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {15--20},
  publisher    = {Karger},
  series       = {Gerontology},
  title        = {The impact of long-term moderate physical activity on functional performance, bone mineral density and fracture incidence in elderly women},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000052765},
  volume       = {47},
  year         = {2001},
}