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Eating difficulties, complications and nursing interventions during a period of three months after a stroke

Westergren, Albert LU ; Ohlsson, Ola and Rahm Hallberg, Ingalill LU (2001) In Journal of Advanced Nursing 35(3). p.416-426
Abstract
AIM: The aim of this study was to describe eating difficulties and especially swallowing in patients with dysphagia, types of nursing intervention, and the development of complications over 3 months. The aim was also to explore common characteristics of eating difficulties that influenced the ability to finish meals. METHODS: Twenty-four consecutive patients admitted because of stroke and dysphagia were included. Nursing interventions, based on assessments, were individually designed. RESULTS: Three subgroups could be identified: those (n=9) who were unable to complete a meal, despite assisted feeding, because of reduced alertness/energy and impaired swallowing function; those (n=5) who could complete a meal, despite suffering from reduced... (More)
AIM: The aim of this study was to describe eating difficulties and especially swallowing in patients with dysphagia, types of nursing intervention, and the development of complications over 3 months. The aim was also to explore common characteristics of eating difficulties that influenced the ability to finish meals. METHODS: Twenty-four consecutive patients admitted because of stroke and dysphagia were included. Nursing interventions, based on assessments, were individually designed. RESULTS: Three subgroups could be identified: those (n=9) who were unable to complete a meal, despite assisted feeding, because of reduced alertness/energy and impaired swallowing function; those (n=5) who could complete a meal, despite suffering from reduced alertness/energy; and those (n=10) who could complete meals with minor difficulties. Patients in the first two groups developed complications such as respiratory infections and/or malnutrition. There was a tendency towards that complications in the third group were less frequent and the hospital stay was significantly shorter than in the other groups. CONCLUSION: The level of alertness/energy in patients with dysphagia after stroke was important for the ability to eat and swallow and the development of complications over time, and thus of great importance for the interventions applied. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
malnutrition, energy, alertness, intervention, dysphagia, nursing care, stroke, respiratory infection
in
Journal of Advanced Nursing
volume
35
issue
3
pages
416 - 426
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • pmid:11489027
  • scopus:0035430402
ISSN
0309-2402
DOI
10.1046/j.1365-2648.2001.01884.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b444551b-770c-4840-a511-f32cf90b793c (old id 1121610)
date added to LUP
2008-07-18 14:08:45
date last changed
2018-05-29 11:01:18
@article{b444551b-770c-4840-a511-f32cf90b793c,
  abstract     = {AIM: The aim of this study was to describe eating difficulties and especially swallowing in patients with dysphagia, types of nursing intervention, and the development of complications over 3 months. The aim was also to explore common characteristics of eating difficulties that influenced the ability to finish meals. METHODS: Twenty-four consecutive patients admitted because of stroke and dysphagia were included. Nursing interventions, based on assessments, were individually designed. RESULTS: Three subgroups could be identified: those (n=9) who were unable to complete a meal, despite assisted feeding, because of reduced alertness/energy and impaired swallowing function; those (n=5) who could complete a meal, despite suffering from reduced alertness/energy; and those (n=10) who could complete meals with minor difficulties. Patients in the first two groups developed complications such as respiratory infections and/or malnutrition. There was a tendency towards that complications in the third group were less frequent and the hospital stay was significantly shorter than in the other groups. CONCLUSION: The level of alertness/energy in patients with dysphagia after stroke was important for the ability to eat and swallow and the development of complications over time, and thus of great importance for the interventions applied.},
  author       = {Westergren, Albert and Ohlsson, Ola and Rahm Hallberg, Ingalill},
  issn         = {0309-2402},
  keyword      = {malnutrition,energy,alertness,intervention,dysphagia,nursing care,stroke,respiratory infection},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {416--426},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Journal of Advanced Nursing},
  title        = {Eating difficulties, complications and nursing interventions during a period of three months after a stroke},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2648.2001.01884.x},
  volume       = {35},
  year         = {2001},
}