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High intake of selenium, beta-carotene, and vitamins A, C, and E reduces growth of Helicobacter pylori in the guinea pig

Sjunnesson, Håkan LU ; Sturegård, Erik LU ; Willen, R and Wadström, Torkel LU (2001) In Comparative Medicine 51(5). p.418-423
Abstract
PURPOSE: Helicobacter pylori is a human gastroduodenal pathogen associated with type-B gastritis and gastric cancer. Low gastric tissue antioxidant levels are believed to increase the risk of developing gastric cancer. We investigated whether dietary antioxidant levels protect against infection and type-B gastritis in H. pylori-infected guinea pigs. METHODS: Dunkin-Hartley guinea pigs infected for 6 weeks with H. pylori were fed diets with various antioxidant levels. Stomach specimens were cultured, and gastritis was graded from 0 to 3. RESULTS: Supplementation with vitamins A, C, and E and with selenium yielded H. pylori recovery from 17% of challenged animals, compared with 43% of those fed a control diet. Gastritis was scored at 0.33... (More)
PURPOSE: Helicobacter pylori is a human gastroduodenal pathogen associated with type-B gastritis and gastric cancer. Low gastric tissue antioxidant levels are believed to increase the risk of developing gastric cancer. We investigated whether dietary antioxidant levels protect against infection and type-B gastritis in H. pylori-infected guinea pigs. METHODS: Dunkin-Hartley guinea pigs infected for 6 weeks with H. pylori were fed diets with various antioxidant levels. Stomach specimens were cultured, and gastritis was graded from 0 to 3. RESULTS: Supplementation with vitamins A, C, and E and with selenium yielded H. pylori recovery from 17% of challenged animals, compared with 43% of those fed a control diet. Gastritis was scored at 0.33 and 0.93, respectively. Supplementation with only vitamin C or astaxanthin had less effect on gastritis and recovery rate. In a second experiment, gastritis score in a group given vitamins A, C, E, and selenium and beta-carotene was 2.25 and in a control group, it was 2.57. The H. pylori recovery rate was 75 and 100%, respectively, with fewer colonies from animals given antioxidant supplementation (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: A combination of antioxidants can protect against H. pylori infection in guinea pigs. In animal studies, antioxidant intake should be low to optimize development of H. pylori-associated disease. Furthermore we established that H. pylori causes severe gastritis in guinea pigs. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Comparative Medicine
volume
51
issue
5
pages
418 - 423
publisher
American Association for Laboratory Animal Science
external identifiers
  • pmid:11924801
ISSN
1532-0820
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
39faeac2-7379-45cb-8bfc-2a314da6269d (old id 1121748)
alternative location
http://www.aalas.org/pdfUtility.aspx?pdf=CM/51_05_04.pdf
date added to LUP
2008-07-15 09:03:47
date last changed
2016-04-16 05:29:35
@article{39faeac2-7379-45cb-8bfc-2a314da6269d,
  abstract     = {PURPOSE: Helicobacter pylori is a human gastroduodenal pathogen associated with type-B gastritis and gastric cancer. Low gastric tissue antioxidant levels are believed to increase the risk of developing gastric cancer. We investigated whether dietary antioxidant levels protect against infection and type-B gastritis in H. pylori-infected guinea pigs. METHODS: Dunkin-Hartley guinea pigs infected for 6 weeks with H. pylori were fed diets with various antioxidant levels. Stomach specimens were cultured, and gastritis was graded from 0 to 3. RESULTS: Supplementation with vitamins A, C, and E and with selenium yielded H. pylori recovery from 17% of challenged animals, compared with 43% of those fed a control diet. Gastritis was scored at 0.33 and 0.93, respectively. Supplementation with only vitamin C or astaxanthin had less effect on gastritis and recovery rate. In a second experiment, gastritis score in a group given vitamins A, C, E, and selenium and beta-carotene was 2.25 and in a control group, it was 2.57. The H. pylori recovery rate was 75 and 100%, respectively, with fewer colonies from animals given antioxidant supplementation (P &lt; 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: A combination of antioxidants can protect against H. pylori infection in guinea pigs. In animal studies, antioxidant intake should be low to optimize development of H. pylori-associated disease. Furthermore we established that H. pylori causes severe gastritis in guinea pigs.},
  author       = {Sjunnesson, Håkan and Sturegård, Erik and Willen, R and Wadström, Torkel},
  issn         = {1532-0820},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {418--423},
  publisher    = {American Association for Laboratory Animal Science},
  series       = {Comparative Medicine},
  title        = {High intake of selenium, beta-carotene, and vitamins A, C, and E reduces growth of Helicobacter pylori in the guinea pig},
  volume       = {51},
  year         = {2001},
}