Advanced

The domain of concern of Swedish occupational therapists in psychiatric care.

Stenbeck, Birgitta LU ; Eklund, Mona LU and Rahm Hallberg, Ingalill LU (2001) In Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy 8(4). p.184-192
Abstract
As a consequence of the development of psychiatric care in Sweden, occupational therapists have adapted their roles to changing practice settings. The aim of this study was to investigate the domain of concern of occupational therapists in psychiatric care, operationalized as perceived responsibilities. Furthermore, the relationships of the domain of concern to underlying theories and models, clinical supervision, intervention strategies, and organization of the care were investigated. Data were collected by a mail questionnaire to occupational therapists working in psychiatric care with a response rate of 67%, in all 334 occupational therapists. A factor analysis revealed six domain-of-concern areas. The three most prominent factors were... (More)
As a consequence of the development of psychiatric care in Sweden, occupational therapists have adapted their roles to changing practice settings. The aim of this study was to investigate the domain of concern of occupational therapists in psychiatric care, operationalized as perceived responsibilities. Furthermore, the relationships of the domain of concern to underlying theories and models, clinical supervision, intervention strategies, and organization of the care were investigated. Data were collected by a mail questionnaire to occupational therapists working in psychiatric care with a response rate of 67%, in all 334 occupational therapists. A factor analysis revealed six domain-of-concern areas. The three most prominent factors were ADL, housing and leisure, Psychosocial dysfunction, and Work and studies, which confirmed that occupational therapists' focus is on the patient's occupational performance skills as well as the environment that supports or hinders the patient's performance. The occupational therapists were using a broad range of underlying theories and models as well as intervention strategies and several relationships to domain-of-concern factors were found. This study gave an overall view of the occupational therapists' domain of concern, but there is also need for a more detailed and thorough understanding of how occupational therapists define their domain of concern, which calls for more qualitatively oriented in-depth studies. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Concern, Domain, Occupational, Therapist, Psychiatric, Care
in
Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy
volume
8
issue
4
pages
184 - 192
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • scopus:0035663982
ISSN
1651-2014
DOI
10.1080/110381201317166540
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ec15f850-0148-4334-9194-d46e1e356862 (old id 1122361)
date added to LUP
2008-08-27 16:40:24
date last changed
2018-01-07 09:04:30
@article{ec15f850-0148-4334-9194-d46e1e356862,
  abstract     = {As a consequence of the development of psychiatric care in Sweden, occupational therapists have adapted their roles to changing practice settings. The aim of this study was to investigate the domain of concern of occupational therapists in psychiatric care, operationalized as perceived responsibilities. Furthermore, the relationships of the domain of concern to underlying theories and models, clinical supervision, intervention strategies, and organization of the care were investigated. Data were collected by a mail questionnaire to occupational therapists working in psychiatric care with a response rate of 67%, in all 334 occupational therapists. A factor analysis revealed six domain-of-concern areas. The three most prominent factors were ADL, housing and leisure, Psychosocial dysfunction, and Work and studies, which confirmed that occupational therapists' focus is on the patient's occupational performance skills as well as the environment that supports or hinders the patient's performance. The occupational therapists were using a broad range of underlying theories and models as well as intervention strategies and several relationships to domain-of-concern factors were found. This study gave an overall view of the occupational therapists' domain of concern, but there is also need for a more detailed and thorough understanding of how occupational therapists define their domain of concern, which calls for more qualitatively oriented in-depth studies.},
  author       = {Stenbeck, Birgitta and Eklund, Mona and Rahm Hallberg, Ingalill},
  issn         = {1651-2014},
  keyword      = {Concern,Domain,Occupational,Therapist,Psychiatric,Care},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {184--192},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy},
  title        = {The domain of concern of Swedish occupational therapists in psychiatric care.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/110381201317166540},
  volume       = {8},
  year         = {2001},
}