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Metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy and computed tomography (CT) in clinical practice. Primary and secondary evaluation for localization of phaeochromocytomas

Berglund, A Scott; Hulthén, Lennart LU ; Manhem, P; Thorsson, Ola LU ; Wollmer, Per LU and Tornquist, C (2001) In Journal of Internal Medicine1989-01-01+01:00 249(3). p.247-251
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To determine the diagnostic value of metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy compared with computed tomography (CT) for the localization of phaeochromocytomas in clinical practice. DESIGN: Retrospective comparison between MIBG scintigrams and CT for localization of phaeochromocytomas in all patients successively examined with MIBG scintigraphy in Malmo from 1984 until January 1997. SETTING: Malmo University Hospital, Sweden. SUBJECTS: Sixty-four patients with clinically suspected phaeochromocytomas. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: MIBG scintigrams and CTs classified as positive or negative based on original interpretations (primary evaluation) and in a secondary evaluation by one blinded examiner are assessed through histological... (More)
OBJECTIVE: To determine the diagnostic value of metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy compared with computed tomography (CT) for the localization of phaeochromocytomas in clinical practice. DESIGN: Retrospective comparison between MIBG scintigrams and CT for localization of phaeochromocytomas in all patients successively examined with MIBG scintigraphy in Malmo from 1984 until January 1997. SETTING: Malmo University Hospital, Sweden. SUBJECTS: Sixty-four patients with clinically suspected phaeochromocytomas. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: MIBG scintigrams and CTs classified as positive or negative based on original interpretations (primary evaluation) and in a secondary evaluation by one blinded examiner are assessed through histological confirmation or clinical rule out of phaeochromocytomas. RESULTS: Twenty-five patients had surgically removed phaeochromocytomas. The remaining 39 patients had no proof of phaeochromocytomas. In the secondary evaluation, sensitivity for MIBG scintigraphy was 88% (22/25) and for CT was 100% (25/25). The specificity for MIBG scintigraphy was 89% (35/39) but only 50% for CT (18/36). Two out of a total of six extra-adrenal tumours were amongst the false-negative MIBG scintigrams. CONCLUSIONS: MIBG scintigraphy for the localization of phaeochromocytomas is superior to CT as far as specificity, whereas CT has a higher sensitivity. After biochemical diagnosis, CT will detect most phaeochromocytomas. MIBG scintigraphy can be of value in patients who show inconclusive results with biochemical testing and CT. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
scintigraphy, phaeochromocytoma, metaiodobenzylguanidine, computed tomography, localization
in
Journal of Internal Medicine1989-01-01+01:00
volume
249
issue
3
pages
247 - 251
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd
external identifiers
  • pmid:11285044
  • scopus:0035025436
ISSN
1365-2796
DOI
10.1046/j.1365-2796.2001.00792.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
6b85c597-6a86-4a45-94cc-5af379333e89 (old id 1122888)
date added to LUP
2008-06-24 14:26:08
date last changed
2018-01-07 09:14:36
@article{6b85c597-6a86-4a45-94cc-5af379333e89,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVE: To determine the diagnostic value of metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy compared with computed tomography (CT) for the localization of phaeochromocytomas in clinical practice. DESIGN: Retrospective comparison between MIBG scintigrams and CT for localization of phaeochromocytomas in all patients successively examined with MIBG scintigraphy in Malmo from 1984 until January 1997. SETTING: Malmo University Hospital, Sweden. SUBJECTS: Sixty-four patients with clinically suspected phaeochromocytomas. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: MIBG scintigrams and CTs classified as positive or negative based on original interpretations (primary evaluation) and in a secondary evaluation by one blinded examiner are assessed through histological confirmation or clinical rule out of phaeochromocytomas. RESULTS: Twenty-five patients had surgically removed phaeochromocytomas. The remaining 39 patients had no proof of phaeochromocytomas. In the secondary evaluation, sensitivity for MIBG scintigraphy was 88% (22/25) and for CT was 100% (25/25). The specificity for MIBG scintigraphy was 89% (35/39) but only 50% for CT (18/36). Two out of a total of six extra-adrenal tumours were amongst the false-negative MIBG scintigrams. CONCLUSIONS: MIBG scintigraphy for the localization of phaeochromocytomas is superior to CT as far as specificity, whereas CT has a higher sensitivity. After biochemical diagnosis, CT will detect most phaeochromocytomas. MIBG scintigraphy can be of value in patients who show inconclusive results with biochemical testing and CT.},
  author       = {Berglund, A Scott and Hulthén, Lennart and Manhem, P and Thorsson, Ola and Wollmer, Per and Tornquist, C},
  issn         = {1365-2796},
  keyword      = {scintigraphy,phaeochromocytoma,metaiodobenzylguanidine,computed tomography,localization},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {247--251},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd},
  series       = {Journal of Internal Medicine1989-01-01+01:00},
  title        = {Metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy and computed tomography (CT) in clinical practice. Primary and secondary evaluation for localization of phaeochromocytomas},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2796.2001.00792.x},
  volume       = {249},
  year         = {2001},
}