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Broad spectrum of time of detection, primary symptoms and disease progression in infants with HIV-1 infection

Naver, L; Ehrnst, A; Belfrage, E; Blomberg, J; Christensson, Bertil LU ; Forsgren, M; Lidin-Janson, G; Lindgren, S; Ljung, Rolf LU and Sonnerborg, A, et al. (2001) In European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases 20(3). p.159-166
Abstract
The relationship between time of HIV-1 detection, appearance of symptoms and disease progression was studied in all 24 HIV-1-infected infants from a cohort of 117 children who were born to HIV-1-infected mothers and monitored from birth. HIV isolation from plasma and mononuclear cells, HIV-1 DNA PCR (polymerase chain reaction) and, retrospectively, a quantitative assay for HIV-1 RNA were used for virus detection. Two infants possibly exhibited a symptomatic primary HIV infection. More children with than without symptoms during the first year of life progressed to immunological class 3 (P=0.013) and to AIDS or death (P=0.003) during follow-up. HIV-1 was detected within 4 days of age in 4 of 16 infants: 3 of them became symptomatic within 1... (More)
The relationship between time of HIV-1 detection, appearance of symptoms and disease progression was studied in all 24 HIV-1-infected infants from a cohort of 117 children who were born to HIV-1-infected mothers and monitored from birth. HIV isolation from plasma and mononuclear cells, HIV-1 DNA PCR (polymerase chain reaction) and, retrospectively, a quantitative assay for HIV-1 RNA were used for virus detection. Two infants possibly exhibited a symptomatic primary HIV infection. More children with than without symptoms during the first year of life progressed to immunological class 3 (P=0.013) and to AIDS or death (P=0.003) during follow-up. HIV-1 was detected within 4 days of age in 4 of 16 infants: 3 of them became symptomatic within 1 year, as did 6 of the remaining 12 infants (not statistically significant). All four infants in whom virus was detected within 4 days of age progressed to severe immunosuppression, compared to 6 of 14 in whom the virus detection test was initially negative prior to the first positive result (n.s.). Two children with previous repeatedly negative HIV detection tests were diagnosed with HIV-1 infection at 8 and 9 months, respectively. Repeated blood sampling is needed for the diagnosis of HIV-1 infection in perinatally exposed infants, and virus detection tests for exclusion of HIV-1 infection must be used with caution. (Less)
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European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases
volume
20
issue
3
pages
159 - 166
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • pmid:11347664
  • scopus:0035034457
ISSN
1435-4373
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language
English
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yes
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9628dfa6-073b-47c8-bb43-b05b093c2310 (old id 1122905)
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2008-07-08 11:17:45
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2018-06-07 12:20:51
@article{9628dfa6-073b-47c8-bb43-b05b093c2310,
  abstract     = {The relationship between time of HIV-1 detection, appearance of symptoms and disease progression was studied in all 24 HIV-1-infected infants from a cohort of 117 children who were born to HIV-1-infected mothers and monitored from birth. HIV isolation from plasma and mononuclear cells, HIV-1 DNA PCR (polymerase chain reaction) and, retrospectively, a quantitative assay for HIV-1 RNA were used for virus detection. Two infants possibly exhibited a symptomatic primary HIV infection. More children with than without symptoms during the first year of life progressed to immunological class 3 (P=0.013) and to AIDS or death (P=0.003) during follow-up. HIV-1 was detected within 4 days of age in 4 of 16 infants: 3 of them became symptomatic within 1 year, as did 6 of the remaining 12 infants (not statistically significant). All four infants in whom virus was detected within 4 days of age progressed to severe immunosuppression, compared to 6 of 14 in whom the virus detection test was initially negative prior to the first positive result (n.s.). Two children with previous repeatedly negative HIV detection tests were diagnosed with HIV-1 infection at 8 and 9 months, respectively. Repeated blood sampling is needed for the diagnosis of HIV-1 infection in perinatally exposed infants, and virus detection tests for exclusion of HIV-1 infection must be used with caution.},
  author       = {Naver, L and Ehrnst, A and Belfrage, E and Blomberg, J and Christensson, Bertil and Forsgren, M and Lidin-Janson, G and Lindgren, S and Ljung, Rolf and Sonnerborg, A and Bohlin, A B},
  issn         = {1435-4373},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {159--166},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases},
  title        = {Broad spectrum of time of detection, primary symptoms and disease progression in infants with HIV-1 infection},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/},
  volume       = {20},
  year         = {2001},
}