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Inferior vestibular neuritis

Halmagyi, G M; Aw, S T; Karlberg, Mikael LU ; Curthoys, I S and Todd, M J (2002) In Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 956. p.306-313
Abstract
Sudden, spontaneous, unilateral loss of vestibular function without simultaneous hearing loss or brain stem signs is generally attributed to a viral infection involving the vestibular nerve and is called acute vestibular neuritis. The clinical hallmarks of acute vestibular neuritis are vertigo, spontaneous nystagmus, and unilateral loss of lateral semicircular function as shown by impulsive and caloric testing. In some patients with vestibular neuritis the process appears to involve only anterior and lateral semicircular function, and these patients are considered to have selective superior vestibular neuritis. Here we report on two patients with acute vertigo, normal lateral semicircular canal function as shown by both impulsive and... (More)
Sudden, spontaneous, unilateral loss of vestibular function without simultaneous hearing loss or brain stem signs is generally attributed to a viral infection involving the vestibular nerve and is called acute vestibular neuritis. The clinical hallmarks of acute vestibular neuritis are vertigo, spontaneous nystagmus, and unilateral loss of lateral semicircular function as shown by impulsive and caloric testing. In some patients with vestibular neuritis the process appears to involve only anterior and lateral semicircular function, and these patients are considered to have selective superior vestibular neuritis. Here we report on two patients with acute vertigo, normal lateral semicircular canal function as shown by both impulsive and caloric testing, but selective loss of posterior semicircular canal function as shown by impulsive testing and of saccular function as shown by vestibular evoked myogenic potential testing. We suggest that these patients had selective inferior vestibular neuritis and that contrary to conventional teaching, in a patient with acute spontaneous vertigo, unilateral loss of lateral semicircular canal function is not essential for a diagnosis of acute vestibular neuritis. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
canal paresis, head impulse, vestibulo-ocular reflex, labyrinthitis, vestibular neuritis
in
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
volume
956
pages
306 - 313
publisher
New York Academy of Sciences
external identifiers
  • pmid:11960814
  • scopus:0036233891
ISSN
0077-8923
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a9d9b339-9d15-421a-9dc2-f43c715c9864 (old id 1123873)
alternative location
http://www.annalsnyas.org/cgi/content/abstract/956/1/306
date added to LUP
2008-05-22 13:39:46
date last changed
2017-10-22 04:35:55
@article{a9d9b339-9d15-421a-9dc2-f43c715c9864,
  abstract     = {Sudden, spontaneous, unilateral loss of vestibular function without simultaneous hearing loss or brain stem signs is generally attributed to a viral infection involving the vestibular nerve and is called acute vestibular neuritis. The clinical hallmarks of acute vestibular neuritis are vertigo, spontaneous nystagmus, and unilateral loss of lateral semicircular function as shown by impulsive and caloric testing. In some patients with vestibular neuritis the process appears to involve only anterior and lateral semicircular function, and these patients are considered to have selective superior vestibular neuritis. Here we report on two patients with acute vertigo, normal lateral semicircular canal function as shown by both impulsive and caloric testing, but selective loss of posterior semicircular canal function as shown by impulsive testing and of saccular function as shown by vestibular evoked myogenic potential testing. We suggest that these patients had selective inferior vestibular neuritis and that contrary to conventional teaching, in a patient with acute spontaneous vertigo, unilateral loss of lateral semicircular canal function is not essential for a diagnosis of acute vestibular neuritis.},
  author       = {Halmagyi, G M and Aw, S T and Karlberg, Mikael and Curthoys, I S and Todd, M J},
  issn         = {0077-8923},
  keyword      = {canal paresis,head impulse,vestibulo-ocular reflex,labyrinthitis,vestibular neuritis},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {306--313},
  publisher    = {New York Academy of Sciences},
  series       = {Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences},
  title        = {Inferior vestibular neuritis},
  volume       = {956},
  year         = {2002},
}