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A study of the association between exercise-induced wheeze and exercise versus methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction in adolescents

Henriksen, Anne Hildur; Tveit, Kjerst Hafstad; Holmen, Turid Lingaas; Sue-Chu, Malcolm and Bjermer, Leif LU (2002) In Pediatric Allergy and Immunology 13(3). p.203-208
Abstract
Among asthmatics, exercise-induced wheeze (EIW) is a frequent symptom, and 40-77% of asthmatics demonstrate exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB). In the North-Trondelag population-based survey of 8,571 adolescents (YOUNG-HUNT), 26% reported wheeze during the previous 12 months (current wheeze). Of those subjects, 50% reported EIW. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between EIW and EIB in randomly selected adolescents with EIW as the only or predominant asthma-like symptom, and to relate our findings to results from methacholine bronchoprovocation tests (MT) and measurements of exhaled nitric oxide (ENO). Sixty-three subjects with current wheeze induced by exercise, but not by allergen exposure, were... (More)
Among asthmatics, exercise-induced wheeze (EIW) is a frequent symptom, and 40-77% of asthmatics demonstrate exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB). In the North-Trondelag population-based survey of 8,571 adolescents (YOUNG-HUNT), 26% reported wheeze during the previous 12 months (current wheeze). Of those subjects, 50% reported EIW. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between EIW and EIB in randomly selected adolescents with EIW as the only or predominant asthma-like symptom, and to relate our findings to results from methacholine bronchoprovocation tests (MT) and measurements of exhaled nitric oxide (ENO). Sixty-three subjects with current wheeze induced by exercise, but not by allergen exposure, were investigated using a treadmill exercise test (ET) and measurements of ENO. Fifty-eight subjects completed a MT on a separate study day. EIB was defined as a fall of >or= 10% in the forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) after exercise (DeltaFEV1%ex). Twenty-one subjects (33%) had EIB and 33 (57%) had a positive MT. The degree of reported dyspnea during the ET was not correlated to the DeltaFEV1%ex. The correlation between EIB and methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction (MIB) was poor, and the DeltaFEV1%ex was more pronounced in smokers than in non-smokers. Moreover, ENO was not increased in subjects with positive vs. negative ET. Hence, EIW, when reported as the only or predominant asthma-like symptom, was linked to EIB in only one-third of the patients. We conclude that EIW is a poor predictor of EIB in epidemiological studies. The poor correlation between EIB and MIB indicates that these two tests measure different mechanisms of bronchial hyper-responsiveness. (Less)
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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Pediatric Allergy and Immunology
volume
13
issue
3
pages
203 - 208
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • pmid:12144643
  • scopus:0036023682
ISSN
0905-6157
DOI
10.1034/j.1399-3038.2002.01034.x
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
6a200eb1-c68b-439c-94d2-6615119ce2db (old id 1123974)
date added to LUP
2008-05-23 08:12:21
date last changed
2017-02-19 04:13:34
@article{6a200eb1-c68b-439c-94d2-6615119ce2db,
  abstract     = {Among asthmatics, exercise-induced wheeze (EIW) is a frequent symptom, and 40-77% of asthmatics demonstrate exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB). In the North-Trondelag population-based survey of 8,571 adolescents (YOUNG-HUNT), 26% reported wheeze during the previous 12 months (current wheeze). Of those subjects, 50% reported EIW. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between EIW and EIB in randomly selected adolescents with EIW as the only or predominant asthma-like symptom, and to relate our findings to results from methacholine bronchoprovocation tests (MT) and measurements of exhaled nitric oxide (ENO). Sixty-three subjects with current wheeze induced by exercise, but not by allergen exposure, were investigated using a treadmill exercise test (ET) and measurements of ENO. Fifty-eight subjects completed a MT on a separate study day. EIB was defined as a fall of >or= 10% in the forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) after exercise (DeltaFEV1%ex). Twenty-one subjects (33%) had EIB and 33 (57%) had a positive MT. The degree of reported dyspnea during the ET was not correlated to the DeltaFEV1%ex. The correlation between EIB and methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction (MIB) was poor, and the DeltaFEV1%ex was more pronounced in smokers than in non-smokers. Moreover, ENO was not increased in subjects with positive vs. negative ET. Hence, EIW, when reported as the only or predominant asthma-like symptom, was linked to EIB in only one-third of the patients. We conclude that EIW is a poor predictor of EIB in epidemiological studies. The poor correlation between EIB and MIB indicates that these two tests measure different mechanisms of bronchial hyper-responsiveness.},
  author       = {Henriksen, Anne Hildur and Tveit, Kjerst Hafstad and Holmen, Turid Lingaas and Sue-Chu, Malcolm and Bjermer, Leif},
  issn         = {0905-6157},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {203--208},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Pediatric Allergy and Immunology},
  title        = {A study of the association between exercise-induced wheeze and exercise versus methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction in adolescents},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1034/j.1399-3038.2002.01034.x},
  volume       = {13},
  year         = {2002},
}