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The impact of routine outcome measurement on treatment processes in community mental health care – approach and methods of the MECCA study

Priebe, S.; McCabe, R.; Bullenkamp, J.; Hansson, Lars LU ; Rössler, W.; Torres-Gonzales, F. and Wiersma, D. (2002) In Epidemiologia e Psichiatria Sociale-An International Journal for Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences 11(3). p.198-205
Abstract
Three issues characterise the background to the MECCA study: A) Throughout Europe, most patients with severe forms of psychotic disorders are cared for in the community. The challenge now is to make processes in community mental health care more effective. B) There are widespread calls to implement regular outcome measurement in routine settings. This, however, is more likely to happen, if it provides a direct benefit to clinicians and patients. C) Whilst user involvement is relatively easy to achieve on a political level, new mechanisms may have to be established to make the views of patients feed into individual treatment decisions. The MECCA study is a cluster randomised controlled trial following the same protocol in community mental... (More)
Three issues characterise the background to the MECCA study: A) Throughout Europe, most patients with severe forms of psychotic disorders are cared for in the community. The challenge now is to make processes in community mental health care more effective. B) There are widespread calls to implement regular outcome measurement in routine settings. This, however, is more likely to happen, if it provides a direct benefit to clinicians and patients. C) Whilst user involvement is relatively easy to achieve on a political level, new mechanisms may have to be established to make the views of patients feed into individual treatment decisions. The MECCA study is a cluster randomised controlled trial following the same protocol in community mental health teams in six European countries. In the experimental group, patients' subjective quality of life, treatment satisfaction and wishes for different or additional help are assessed in key worker-patient meetings every two months and intended to inform the therapeutic dialogue and treatment decisions. The trial tests the hypothesis that the intervention--as compared to current best standard practice--will lead to a better outcome in terms of quality of life and other criteria in patients with psychotic disorders over a one year period. This more favourable outcome is assumed to be mediated through different treatment input based on more appropriate joint decisions or a more positive therapeutic relationship in line with a partnership model of care or both. Moreover, the study will hopefully reveal new insights into how therapeutic processes in community mental health care work and how they can be optimised. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Epidemiologia e Psichiatria Sociale-An International Journal for Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences
volume
11
issue
3
pages
198 - 205
publisher
Il Pensiero scientifico editore
external identifiers
  • scopus:0036661418
ISSN
1121-189X
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
31a64af5-bab6-4083-9578-df8093a5df6d (old id 1124182)
date added to LUP
2008-05-29 15:00:58
date last changed
2017-03-12 03:32:06
@article{31a64af5-bab6-4083-9578-df8093a5df6d,
  abstract     = {Three issues characterise the background to the MECCA study: A) Throughout Europe, most patients with severe forms of psychotic disorders are cared for in the community. The challenge now is to make processes in community mental health care more effective. B) There are widespread calls to implement regular outcome measurement in routine settings. This, however, is more likely to happen, if it provides a direct benefit to clinicians and patients. C) Whilst user involvement is relatively easy to achieve on a political level, new mechanisms may have to be established to make the views of patients feed into individual treatment decisions. The MECCA study is a cluster randomised controlled trial following the same protocol in community mental health teams in six European countries. In the experimental group, patients' subjective quality of life, treatment satisfaction and wishes for different or additional help are assessed in key worker-patient meetings every two months and intended to inform the therapeutic dialogue and treatment decisions. The trial tests the hypothesis that the intervention--as compared to current best standard practice--will lead to a better outcome in terms of quality of life and other criteria in patients with psychotic disorders over a one year period. This more favourable outcome is assumed to be mediated through different treatment input based on more appropriate joint decisions or a more positive therapeutic relationship in line with a partnership model of care or both. Moreover, the study will hopefully reveal new insights into how therapeutic processes in community mental health care work and how they can be optimised.},
  author       = {Priebe, S. and McCabe, R. and Bullenkamp, J. and Hansson, Lars and Rössler, W. and Torres-Gonzales, F. and Wiersma, D.},
  issn         = {1121-189X},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {198--205},
  publisher    = {Il Pensiero scientifico editore},
  series       = {Epidemiologia e Psichiatria Sociale-An International Journal for Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences},
  title        = {The impact of routine outcome measurement on treatment processes in community mental health care – approach and methods of the MECCA study},
  volume       = {11},
  year         = {2002},
}