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Diabetes and impaired fasting glycemia in a rural population of Bangladesh

Sayeed, M Abu; Mahtab, Hajera; Akter Khanam, Parvin; Abdul Latif, Zafar; Keramat Ali, S M; Banu, Akhter; Ahrén, Bo LU and Azad Khan, A K (2003) In Diabetes Care 26(4). p.1034-1039
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of type 2 diabetes and impaired fasting glycemia (IFG) in a rural population of Bangladesh. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A cluster sampling of 4,923 subjects >/=20 years old in a rural community were investigated. Fasting plasma glucose, blood pressure, height, weight, and girth of waist and hip were measured. BMI and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) were calculated. Total cholesterol, triglycerides, and HDL cholesterol were also estimated. We used the 1997 American Diabetes Association diagnostic criteria. RESULTS: The crude prevalence of type 2 diabetes was 4.3% and IFG was 12.4%. The age-standardized prevalence of type 2 diabetes (95% CI) was 3.8% (3.12-4.49) and IFG was 13.0% (11.76-14.16). The... (More)
OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of type 2 diabetes and impaired fasting glycemia (IFG) in a rural population of Bangladesh. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A cluster sampling of 4,923 subjects >/=20 years old in a rural community were investigated. Fasting plasma glucose, blood pressure, height, weight, and girth of waist and hip were measured. BMI and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) were calculated. Total cholesterol, triglycerides, and HDL cholesterol were also estimated. We used the 1997 American Diabetes Association diagnostic criteria. RESULTS: The crude prevalence of type 2 diabetes was 4.3% and IFG was 12.4%. The age-standardized prevalence of type 2 diabetes (95% CI) was 3.8% (3.12-4.49) and IFG was 13.0% (11.76-14.16). The subjects with higher family income had significantly higher prevalence of type 2 diabetes (5.9 vs. 3.5%, P < 0.001) and IFG (15.6 vs. 10.8%, P < 0.001) than those with lower income. Employing logistic regression in different models, we found that wealthy class, family history of diabetes, reduced physical exercise, and increased age, BMI, and WHR were the important predictors of diabetes. Total cholesterol, triglycerides, and HDL cholesterol showed no association with diabetes and IFG. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of diabetes and IFG in the rural population was found to be on the increase compared with the previous reports of Bangladesh and other Asian studies. Older age, higher obesity, higher income, family history of diabetes, and reduced physical activity were proved significant risk factors for diabetes and IFG, whereas plasma lipids showed no association with diabetes and IFG. Further study may address whether diabetes is causally associated with insulin deficiency or insulin resistance. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Diabetes Care
volume
26
issue
4
pages
1034 - 1039
publisher
American Diabetes Association
external identifiers
  • pmid:12663569
  • scopus:0043169750
ISSN
1935-5548
DOI
10.2337/diacare.26.4.1034
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c8fac044-99f8-473d-a7cd-67dc8bd44698 (old id 1126279)
date added to LUP
2008-06-12 09:04:13
date last changed
2018-01-07 08:43:54
@article{c8fac044-99f8-473d-a7cd-67dc8bd44698,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of type 2 diabetes and impaired fasting glycemia (IFG) in a rural population of Bangladesh. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A cluster sampling of 4,923 subjects &gt;/=20 years old in a rural community were investigated. Fasting plasma glucose, blood pressure, height, weight, and girth of waist and hip were measured. BMI and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) were calculated. Total cholesterol, triglycerides, and HDL cholesterol were also estimated. We used the 1997 American Diabetes Association diagnostic criteria. RESULTS: The crude prevalence of type 2 diabetes was 4.3% and IFG was 12.4%. The age-standardized prevalence of type 2 diabetes (95% CI) was 3.8% (3.12-4.49) and IFG was 13.0% (11.76-14.16). The subjects with higher family income had significantly higher prevalence of type 2 diabetes (5.9 vs. 3.5%, P &lt; 0.001) and IFG (15.6 vs. 10.8%, P &lt; 0.001) than those with lower income. Employing logistic regression in different models, we found that wealthy class, family history of diabetes, reduced physical exercise, and increased age, BMI, and WHR were the important predictors of diabetes. Total cholesterol, triglycerides, and HDL cholesterol showed no association with diabetes and IFG. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of diabetes and IFG in the rural population was found to be on the increase compared with the previous reports of Bangladesh and other Asian studies. Older age, higher obesity, higher income, family history of diabetes, and reduced physical activity were proved significant risk factors for diabetes and IFG, whereas plasma lipids showed no association with diabetes and IFG. Further study may address whether diabetes is causally associated with insulin deficiency or insulin resistance.},
  author       = {Sayeed, M Abu and Mahtab, Hajera and Akter Khanam, Parvin and Abdul Latif, Zafar and Keramat Ali, S M and Banu, Akhter and Ahrén, Bo and Azad Khan, A K},
  issn         = {1935-5548},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {1034--1039},
  publisher    = {American Diabetes Association},
  series       = {Diabetes Care},
  title        = {Diabetes and impaired fasting glycemia in a rural population of Bangladesh},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2337/diacare.26.4.1034},
  volume       = {26},
  year         = {2003},
}