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Neural expression and increased lavage fluid levels of secretoneurin in seasonal allergic rhinitis.

Korsgren, Magnus LU ; Erjefalt, Jonas S; Hinterholzl, Josef; Fischer-Colbrie, Reiner; Ahlstrom Emanuelsson, Cecilia; Andersson, Morgan; Persson, Carl LU ; Mackay-Sim, Alan; Sundler, Frank LU and Greiff, Lennart LU (2003) In American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine 167(11). p.1504-1508
Abstract
Secretoneurin is a neuropeptide potentially involved in migration of eosinophils, monocytes, and dendritic cells. Whether secretoneurin is present in the human airway mucosa and whether it is released at ongoing allergic airway inflammation is currently unknown. In patients with allergic rhinitis, we have explored the occurrence of secretoneurin in nasal mucosal biopsies and lavage fluids before and during natural allergen exposure. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed an abundance of nerves displaying secretoneurin immunoreactivity, which were distributed predominantly around blood vessels and submucosal glands. A majority of nerve fibers containing vesicular acetylcholine transporter, tyrosine hydroxylase, calcitonin gene–related... (More)
Secretoneurin is a neuropeptide potentially involved in migration of eosinophils, monocytes, and dendritic cells. Whether secretoneurin is present in the human airway mucosa and whether it is released at ongoing allergic airway inflammation is currently unknown. In patients with allergic rhinitis, we have explored the occurrence of secretoneurin in nasal mucosal biopsies and lavage fluids before and during natural allergen exposure. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed an abundance of nerves displaying secretoneurin immunoreactivity, which were distributed predominantly around blood vessels and submucosal glands. A majority of nerve fibers containing vesicular acetylcholine transporter, tyrosine hydroxylase, calcitonin gene–related peptide, and vasoactive intestinal peptide were also secretoneurin-immunoreactive, indicating a localization of secretoneurin in cholinergic, adrenergic, and sensory nerves. Lavage fluid levels of secretoneurin were increased at allergen exposure (p < 0.01–0.05). Levels of secretoneurin did not correlate with eosinophil cationic protein ({rho} = 0.1, p = 0.7). We conclude that secretoneurin has a widespread occurrence in nasal mucosal nerves of patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis and that increased nasal lavage fluid levels of secretoneurin may characterize ongoing allergen exposure. These data favor a role of secretoneurin in the local traffic of immune cells in human airway mucosa. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
allergic airway inflammation, neuropeptides, eosinophils
in
American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
volume
167
issue
11
pages
1504 - 1508
publisher
Am Thoracic Soc
external identifiers
  • wos:000183078300011
  • pmid:12626352
  • scopus:0037794409
ISSN
1535-4970
DOI
10.1164/rccm.200212-1508OC
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
217a57e4-32ee-48dc-b7cb-7f21b0ace4b3 (old id 112915)
date added to LUP
2007-06-26 10:39:29
date last changed
2018-10-21 03:30:36
@article{217a57e4-32ee-48dc-b7cb-7f21b0ace4b3,
  abstract     = {Secretoneurin is a neuropeptide potentially involved in migration of eosinophils, monocytes, and dendritic cells. Whether secretoneurin is present in the human airway mucosa and whether it is released at ongoing allergic airway inflammation is currently unknown. In patients with allergic rhinitis, we have explored the occurrence of secretoneurin in nasal mucosal biopsies and lavage fluids before and during natural allergen exposure. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed an abundance of nerves displaying secretoneurin immunoreactivity, which were distributed predominantly around blood vessels and submucosal glands. A majority of nerve fibers containing vesicular acetylcholine transporter, tyrosine hydroxylase, calcitonin gene–related peptide, and vasoactive intestinal peptide were also secretoneurin-immunoreactive, indicating a localization of secretoneurin in cholinergic, adrenergic, and sensory nerves. Lavage fluid levels of secretoneurin were increased at allergen exposure (p &lt; 0.01–0.05). Levels of secretoneurin did not correlate with eosinophil cationic protein ({rho} = 0.1, p = 0.7). We conclude that secretoneurin has a widespread occurrence in nasal mucosal nerves of patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis and that increased nasal lavage fluid levels of secretoneurin may characterize ongoing allergen exposure. These data favor a role of secretoneurin in the local traffic of immune cells in human airway mucosa.},
  author       = {Korsgren, Magnus and Erjefalt, Jonas S and Hinterholzl, Josef and Fischer-Colbrie, Reiner and Ahlstrom Emanuelsson, Cecilia and Andersson, Morgan and Persson, Carl and Mackay-Sim, Alan and Sundler, Frank and Greiff, Lennart},
  issn         = {1535-4970},
  keyword      = {allergic airway inflammation,neuropeptides,eosinophils},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {1504--1508},
  publisher    = {Am Thoracic Soc},
  series       = {American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine},
  title        = {Neural expression and increased lavage fluid levels of secretoneurin in seasonal allergic rhinitis.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/rccm.200212-1508OC},
  volume       = {167},
  year         = {2003},
}