Advanced

Epidemiological evaluation of cytogenetic biomarkers as potential surrogate end-points for cancer

Hagmar, Lars; Strömberg, Ulf LU ; Tinnerberg, Hakan and Mikoczy, Zoli LU (2004) In IARC Scientific Publications p.207-215
Abstract
Various occupational exposures have been monitored by chromosomal aberrations, sister chromatid exchanges and micronuclei in peripheral blood lymphocytes. During the last decade, epidemiological studies have evaluated whether any of these markers foreshadows cancer risk. Results from Nordic, Italian and Czech cohorts support an approximately twofold cancer risk among subjects with high frequencies of chromosomal aberrations, but no such association was seen for any of the other biomarkers. The estimated attributable proportion of high frequencies of chromosomal aberrations for overall cancer risk is 0.25, which gives a quantitative estimate of the chromosomal aberration assay as a surrogate endpoint of cancer. The results from the... (More)
Various occupational exposures have been monitored by chromosomal aberrations, sister chromatid exchanges and micronuclei in peripheral blood lymphocytes. During the last decade, epidemiological studies have evaluated whether any of these markers foreshadows cancer risk. Results from Nordic, Italian and Czech cohorts support an approximately twofold cancer risk among subjects with high frequencies of chromosomal aberrations, but no such association was seen for any of the other biomarkers. The estimated attributable proportion of high frequencies of chromosomal aberrations for overall cancer risk is 0.25, which gives a quantitative estimate of the chromosomal aberration assay as a surrogate endpoint of cancer. The results from the different cohort studies are contradictory in terms of whether or not the predictive value of the chromosomal aberration assay for cancer is differential with respect to occupational exposure to clastogens. Genetic susceptibility factors are known to affect the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes. It is quite possible that such factors might also affect the frequency of chromosomal aberrations directly or might modify the impact of exposures to clastogen. There is no other biomarker for general cancer risk that is applicable to healthy subjects from the general population with such a high attributable proportion. However, at present only a simplified and tentative model can be proposed for the role of the chromosomal aberration marker in the pathogenesis of cancer. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
IARC Scientific Publications
issue
157
pages
207 - 215
publisher
IARC Press
external identifiers
  • pmid:15055297
  • scopus:1842862759
ISSN
0300-5038
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0fdff99a-eaca-4457-9fee-f7f7dba9a20c (old id 1129871)
date added to LUP
2008-06-16 08:46:59
date last changed
2017-08-27 05:36:55
@article{0fdff99a-eaca-4457-9fee-f7f7dba9a20c,
  abstract     = {Various occupational exposures have been monitored by chromosomal aberrations, sister chromatid exchanges and micronuclei in peripheral blood lymphocytes. During the last decade, epidemiological studies have evaluated whether any of these markers foreshadows cancer risk. Results from Nordic, Italian and Czech cohorts support an approximately twofold cancer risk among subjects with high frequencies of chromosomal aberrations, but no such association was seen for any of the other biomarkers. The estimated attributable proportion of high frequencies of chromosomal aberrations for overall cancer risk is 0.25, which gives a quantitative estimate of the chromosomal aberration assay as a surrogate endpoint of cancer. The results from the different cohort studies are contradictory in terms of whether or not the predictive value of the chromosomal aberration assay for cancer is differential with respect to occupational exposure to clastogens. Genetic susceptibility factors are known to affect the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes. It is quite possible that such factors might also affect the frequency of chromosomal aberrations directly or might modify the impact of exposures to clastogen. There is no other biomarker for general cancer risk that is applicable to healthy subjects from the general population with such a high attributable proportion. However, at present only a simplified and tentative model can be proposed for the role of the chromosomal aberration marker in the pathogenesis of cancer.},
  author       = {Hagmar, Lars and Strömberg, Ulf and Tinnerberg, Hakan and Mikoczy, Zoli},
  issn         = {0300-5038},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {157},
  pages        = {207--215},
  publisher    = {IARC Press},
  series       = {IARC Scientific Publications},
  title        = {Epidemiological evaluation of cytogenetic biomarkers as potential surrogate end-points for cancer},
  year         = {2004},
}