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Prognosis of asymptomatic stenosis of the middle cerebral artery

Kremer, Christine LU ; Schaettin, T; Georgiadis, D and Baumgartner, R W (2004) In Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry 75(9). p.1300-1303
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The risk of ischaemic events in asymptomatic intracranial atherosclerosis is unknown. OBJECTIVE: To follow up patients with asymptomatic atherosclerotic middle cerebral artery stenosis (MCAS) to evaluate the long term stroke risk in its territory. METHODS: Consecutive white patients with asymptomatic atherosclerotic MCAS were enrolled. Patients with MCAS of possible or proven non-atherosclerotic origin were excluded. MCAS was assessed by transcranial colour duplex sonography according to published angiography validated criteria. Medical treatment was given at the discretion of the treating physician. RESULTS: 50 patients were included and followed for (mean (SD)) 815 (351) days; three were lost to follow up. MCAS was < 50%... (More)
BACKGROUND: The risk of ischaemic events in asymptomatic intracranial atherosclerosis is unknown. OBJECTIVE: To follow up patients with asymptomatic atherosclerotic middle cerebral artery stenosis (MCAS) to evaluate the long term stroke risk in its territory. METHODS: Consecutive white patients with asymptomatic atherosclerotic MCAS were enrolled. Patients with MCAS of possible or proven non-atherosclerotic origin were excluded. MCAS was assessed by transcranial colour duplex sonography according to published angiography validated criteria. Medical treatment was given at the discretion of the treating physician. RESULTS: 50 patients were included and followed for (mean (SD)) 815 (351) days; three were lost to follow up. MCAS was < 50% in 38 and > or = 50% in 12. No patient suffered an ischaemic event in the MCAS territory; one had a transient ischaemic attack in the contralateral hemisphere. Three patients died, one from a subdural haematoma in the contralateral hemisphere, and two from non-stroke-related causes. Medical treatment at baseline included antithrombotic drugs in 42 cases (antiplatelet agent, n = 39; warfarin, n = 3), and statins in 22; at the end of follow up 45 of the 47 survivors were on antithrombotic drugs (antiplatelet agent, n = 37; warfarin, n = 8), and 30 were on statins. CONCLUSIONS: Asymptomatic MCAS of atherosclerotic origin appears to have a benign long term prognosis with a low risk of ipsilateral stroke in medically treated white patients. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry
volume
75
issue
9
pages
1300 - 1303
publisher
BMJ Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • pmid:15314120
  • scopus:4344601559
ISSN
1468-330X
DOI
10.1136/jnnp.2003.017863
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d2e0e8e7-9dad-43ba-b098-86726d271716 (old id 1130890)
date added to LUP
2008-06-16 14:00:16
date last changed
2017-07-30 04:43:58
@article{d2e0e8e7-9dad-43ba-b098-86726d271716,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: The risk of ischaemic events in asymptomatic intracranial atherosclerosis is unknown. OBJECTIVE: To follow up patients with asymptomatic atherosclerotic middle cerebral artery stenosis (MCAS) to evaluate the long term stroke risk in its territory. METHODS: Consecutive white patients with asymptomatic atherosclerotic MCAS were enrolled. Patients with MCAS of possible or proven non-atherosclerotic origin were excluded. MCAS was assessed by transcranial colour duplex sonography according to published angiography validated criteria. Medical treatment was given at the discretion of the treating physician. RESULTS: 50 patients were included and followed for (mean (SD)) 815 (351) days; three were lost to follow up. MCAS was &lt; 50% in 38 and &gt; or = 50% in 12. No patient suffered an ischaemic event in the MCAS territory; one had a transient ischaemic attack in the contralateral hemisphere. Three patients died, one from a subdural haematoma in the contralateral hemisphere, and two from non-stroke-related causes. Medical treatment at baseline included antithrombotic drugs in 42 cases (antiplatelet agent, n = 39; warfarin, n = 3), and statins in 22; at the end of follow up 45 of the 47 survivors were on antithrombotic drugs (antiplatelet agent, n = 37; warfarin, n = 8), and 30 were on statins. CONCLUSIONS: Asymptomatic MCAS of atherosclerotic origin appears to have a benign long term prognosis with a low risk of ipsilateral stroke in medically treated white patients.},
  author       = {Kremer, Christine and Schaettin, T and Georgiadis, D and Baumgartner, R W},
  issn         = {1468-330X},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {1300--1303},
  publisher    = {BMJ Publishing Group},
  series       = {Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry},
  title        = {Prognosis of asymptomatic stenosis of the middle cerebral artery},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jnnp.2003.017863},
  volume       = {75},
  year         = {2004},
}