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Childhood cancer survival trends in Europe: a EUROCARE Working Group study

Gatta, Gemma; Capocaccia, Riccardo; Stiller, Charles; Kaatsch, Peter; Berrino, Franco; Terenziani, Monica; Storm, H H; Aareleid, T; Hakulinen, T and Hédelin, G, et al. (2005) In Journal of Clinical Oncology 23(16). p.3742-3751
Abstract
PURPOSE: EUROCARE collected data from population-based cancer registries in 20 European countries. We used this data to compare childhood cancer survival time trends in Europe. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Survival in 44,129 children diagnosed under the age of 15 years during 1983 to 1994 was analyzed. Sex- and age-adjusted 5-year survival trends for 10 common cancers and for all cancers combined were estimated for five regions (West Germany, the United Kingdom, Eastern Europe, Nordic countries, and West and South Europe) and Europe as a whole. Europe-wide trends for 14 rare cancers were estimated. RESULTS: For all cancers combined, 5-year survival increased from 65% for diagnoses in 1983 to 1985 to 75% in 1992 to 1994. Survival improved for all... (More)
PURPOSE: EUROCARE collected data from population-based cancer registries in 20 European countries. We used this data to compare childhood cancer survival time trends in Europe. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Survival in 44,129 children diagnosed under the age of 15 years during 1983 to 1994 was analyzed. Sex- and age-adjusted 5-year survival trends for 10 common cancers and for all cancers combined were estimated for five regions (West Germany, the United Kingdom, Eastern Europe, Nordic countries, and West and South Europe) and Europe as a whole. Europe-wide trends for 14 rare cancers were estimated. RESULTS: For all cancers combined, 5-year survival increased from 65% for diagnoses in 1983 to 1985 to 75% in 1992 to 1994. Survival improved for all individual cancers except melanoma, osteosarcoma, and thyroid carcinoma; although for retinoblastoma, chondrosarcoma, and fibrosarcoma, improvements were not significant. The most marked improvements (50% to 66%) occurred in Eastern Europe. For common cancers, the greatest improvements were for leukemia and lymphomas, with risk of dying reducing significantly by 5% to 6% per year. Survival for CNS tumors improved significantly from 57% to 65%, with risk reducing by 3% per year. Risk reduced by 4% per year for neuroblastoma and 3% per year for Wilms' tumor and rhabdomyosarcoma. The survival gap between regions reduced over the period, particularly for acute nonlymphocytic leukemia, CNS tumors, and rhabdomyosarcoma. For rare Burkitt's lymphoma, hepatoblastoma, gonadal germ cell tumors, and nasopharyngeal carcinoma, risk reductions were at least 10% per year. CONCLUSION: These gratifying improvements in survival can often be plausibly related to advances in treatment. The prevalence of European adults with a history of childhood cancer will inevitably increase. (Less)
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in
Journal of Clinical Oncology
volume
23
issue
16
pages
3742 - 3751
publisher
American Society of Clinical Oncology
external identifiers
  • pmid:15923571
  • scopus:20544471175
ISSN
1527-7755
DOI
10.1200/JCO.2005.00.554
language
English
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no
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773021a7-480a-4cf7-8d2f-d4ac98422d16 (old id 1132324)
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2008-06-27 14:24:53
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2017-10-29 03:25:03
@article{773021a7-480a-4cf7-8d2f-d4ac98422d16,
  abstract     = {PURPOSE: EUROCARE collected data from population-based cancer registries in 20 European countries. We used this data to compare childhood cancer survival time trends in Europe. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Survival in 44,129 children diagnosed under the age of 15 years during 1983 to 1994 was analyzed. Sex- and age-adjusted 5-year survival trends for 10 common cancers and for all cancers combined were estimated for five regions (West Germany, the United Kingdom, Eastern Europe, Nordic countries, and West and South Europe) and Europe as a whole. Europe-wide trends for 14 rare cancers were estimated. RESULTS: For all cancers combined, 5-year survival increased from 65% for diagnoses in 1983 to 1985 to 75% in 1992 to 1994. Survival improved for all individual cancers except melanoma, osteosarcoma, and thyroid carcinoma; although for retinoblastoma, chondrosarcoma, and fibrosarcoma, improvements were not significant. The most marked improvements (50% to 66%) occurred in Eastern Europe. For common cancers, the greatest improvements were for leukemia and lymphomas, with risk of dying reducing significantly by 5% to 6% per year. Survival for CNS tumors improved significantly from 57% to 65%, with risk reducing by 3% per year. Risk reduced by 4% per year for neuroblastoma and 3% per year for Wilms' tumor and rhabdomyosarcoma. The survival gap between regions reduced over the period, particularly for acute nonlymphocytic leukemia, CNS tumors, and rhabdomyosarcoma. For rare Burkitt's lymphoma, hepatoblastoma, gonadal germ cell tumors, and nasopharyngeal carcinoma, risk reductions were at least 10% per year. CONCLUSION: These gratifying improvements in survival can often be plausibly related to advances in treatment. The prevalence of European adults with a history of childhood cancer will inevitably increase.},
  author       = {Gatta, Gemma and Capocaccia, Riccardo and Stiller, Charles and Kaatsch, Peter and Berrino, Franco and Terenziani, Monica and Storm, H H and Aareleid, T and Hakulinen, T and Hédelin, G and Tron, I and Le Gall, E and Launoy, G and Macé-Lesech, J and Faivre, J and Chaplain, G and Carli, P-M and Lacour, B and Berger, C and Freycon, F and Estève, J and Tryggvadottir, L and Allemani, C and Baili, P and Ciccolallo, L and Micheli, A and Sant,, M and Taussig, E and Carrani,, E and De Angelis, R and Roazzi, P and Santaquilani, M and Tavilla, A and Valente, F and Verdecchia, A and Ferretti, S and Crosignani, p and Tagliabue, G and Ramazzotti, V and Cercato, M C and Vercelli, M and Orengo, A and De Lisi, V and Serventi, L and Magnani, C and Pastore, G and Gafa`, L and Tumino, R and Paci, E and Crocetti, E and Langmark, F and Andersen, A and Rachtan, J and Plesˇko, I and Obsitníkova´, A and Pompe-Kirn, V and Ardanaz, E and Moreno, C and Galceran, J and Torrella, A and Peris-Bonet, R and Barlow, L and Möller, Torgil and Jundt, G and Lutz, J-M and Usel, M and Coebergh, J W W and Coleman, M P and Steward, J A and Black, R and Brewster, D},
  issn         = {1527-7755},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {16},
  pages        = {3742--3751},
  publisher    = {American Society of Clinical Oncology},
  series       = {Journal of Clinical Oncology},
  title        = {Childhood cancer survival trends in Europe: a EUROCARE Working Group study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1200/JCO.2005.00.554},
  volume       = {23},
  year         = {2005},
}