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Varicella zoster in Guinea-Bissau: intensity of exposure and severity of infection

Poulsen, Anja; Cabral, Fernando; Nielsen, Jens; Roth, Adam LU ; Lisse, Ida Maria; Vestergaard, Bent Faber and Aaby, Peter (2005) In Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal 24(2). p.102-107
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe the epidemiology of and risk factors for severe chickenpox in Guinea- Bissau. METHODS: A prospective household study in a semiurban area of the capital. Severity was assessed by number of pox, fever response and presence of pneumonia. Severity was compared for the first case in a house, that is, the index case, and the secondary cases infected at home. RESULT: We identified 1539 cases of chickenpox. The median age was lower for boys and secondary cases (both P < 0.03); 44.6% of children were 1-4 years of age. The likely minimum interval between index and secondary cases was 10 days; most secondary cases occurred 14-17 days after the index case. The length of the incubation period was related to the intensity of... (More)
OBJECTIVE: To describe the epidemiology of and risk factors for severe chickenpox in Guinea- Bissau. METHODS: A prospective household study in a semiurban area of the capital. Severity was assessed by number of pox, fever response and presence of pneumonia. Severity was compared for the first case in a house, that is, the index case, and the secondary cases infected at home. RESULT: We identified 1539 cases of chickenpox. The median age was lower for boys and secondary cases (both P < 0.03); 44.6% of children were 1-4 years of age. The likely minimum interval between index and secondary cases was 10 days; most secondary cases occurred 14-17 days after the index case. The length of the incubation period was related to the intensity of exposure (P < 0.01). The number of pox was higher for secondary cases (P < 0.01) and was related to intensity of exposure (P < 0.01). Secondary cases had higher fever and more frequently pneumonia (relative risk, 2.17; 95% confidence interval, 1.54-3.08). Children with pneumonia were younger and had more pox. Nutritional status was not related to severity. CONCLUSIONS: Age and intensity of exposure are important determinants for severity of chickenpox infection. The length of the incubation period depends on intensity of exposure, suggesting that the dose of infection might be important. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal
volume
24
issue
2
pages
102 - 107
publisher
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
external identifiers
  • pmid:15702036
  • scopus:13844255754
ISSN
1532-0987
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
03d2f1ab-b7e2-4520-902a-854aab96f01d (old id 1132900)
alternative location
http://www.pidj.org/pt/re/pidj/abstract.00006454-200502000-00003.htm;jsessionid=LfhX7y20L0kmCfvVjvDFNs4d4gST0GQc6TCX2hJXnCycN60V151j!544421999!181195628!8091!-1
date added to LUP
2008-06-23 14:47:49
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:13:02
@article{03d2f1ab-b7e2-4520-902a-854aab96f01d,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVE: To describe the epidemiology of and risk factors for severe chickenpox in Guinea- Bissau. METHODS: A prospective household study in a semiurban area of the capital. Severity was assessed by number of pox, fever response and presence of pneumonia. Severity was compared for the first case in a house, that is, the index case, and the secondary cases infected at home. RESULT: We identified 1539 cases of chickenpox. The median age was lower for boys and secondary cases (both P &lt; 0.03); 44.6% of children were 1-4 years of age. The likely minimum interval between index and secondary cases was 10 days; most secondary cases occurred 14-17 days after the index case. The length of the incubation period was related to the intensity of exposure (P &lt; 0.01). The number of pox was higher for secondary cases (P &lt; 0.01) and was related to intensity of exposure (P &lt; 0.01). Secondary cases had higher fever and more frequently pneumonia (relative risk, 2.17; 95% confidence interval, 1.54-3.08). Children with pneumonia were younger and had more pox. Nutritional status was not related to severity. CONCLUSIONS: Age and intensity of exposure are important determinants for severity of chickenpox infection. The length of the incubation period depends on intensity of exposure, suggesting that the dose of infection might be important.},
  author       = {Poulsen, Anja and Cabral, Fernando and Nielsen, Jens and Roth, Adam and Lisse, Ida Maria and Vestergaard, Bent Faber and Aaby, Peter},
  issn         = {1532-0987},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {102--107},
  publisher    = {Lippincott Williams & Wilkins},
  series       = {Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal},
  title        = {Varicella zoster in Guinea-Bissau: intensity of exposure and severity of infection},
  volume       = {24},
  year         = {2005},
}