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Congenital malformations in infants whose mothers reported the use of folic acid in early pregnancy in Sweden. A prospective population study

Källén, Bengt LU (2007) In Congenital Anomalies 47(4). p.119-124
Abstract
The use of folic acid prior to conception is generally recommended for the prevention of birth defects, notably neural tube defects. In a previous study from Sweden, based on interviews of women in early pregnancy, no such effect was found on the general malformation rate, but data for neural tube defects were scarce. Using data from the Swedish Medical Birth Register for the years 1995-2004, 20 891 women were identified who reported the use of folic acid in early pregnancy, but not of anticonvulsants. These women were compared to all other women who gave birth during the study period. Malformations in the infants born were identified from multiple sources. No reduction in the general malformation rate was seen among infants born to women... (More)
The use of folic acid prior to conception is generally recommended for the prevention of birth defects, notably neural tube defects. In a previous study from Sweden, based on interviews of women in early pregnancy, no such effect was found on the general malformation rate, but data for neural tube defects were scarce. Using data from the Swedish Medical Birth Register for the years 1995-2004, 20 891 women were identified who reported the use of folic acid in early pregnancy, but not of anticonvulsants. These women were compared to all other women who gave birth during the study period. Malformations in the infants born were identified from multiple sources. No reduction in the general malformation rate was seen among infants born to women who reported the use of folic acid (OR = 1.09, 95% CI 1.02-1.17) and no effect of neural tube defect rate was seen (RR = 1.35, 95% CI 0.82-2.22), based on 16 infants with neural tube defect whose mother reported the use of folic acid. No effect was seen on the rates of other malformations except for cardiac defects, where a statistically significant increased risk (notably for severe defects) was found (OR = 1.19, 95% CI 1.05-1.35). The effect of various deficiencies in data collection is discussed, but is unlikely to explain the lack of protective effect noticed. So far, it has not been possible to demonstrate a beneficial effect of folic acid supplementation on malformation risk in Sweden. A more complete ascertainment and detailed timing and dosage of folic acid use in a prospective study is recommended. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
supplementation, register, congenital malformation, folic acid, neural tube defect
in
Congenital Anomalies
volume
47
issue
4
pages
119 - 124
publisher
Japanese Teratology Society
external identifiers
  • pmid:17988253
  • scopus:35848968658
ISSN
0914-3505
DOI
10.1111/j.1741-4520.2007.00159.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
80aea2f1-3dda-4575-8bf8-d0ec6f579606 (old id 1138985)
date added to LUP
2008-08-20 08:59:22
date last changed
2017-02-22 10:46:36
@article{80aea2f1-3dda-4575-8bf8-d0ec6f579606,
  abstract     = {The use of folic acid prior to conception is generally recommended for the prevention of birth defects, notably neural tube defects. In a previous study from Sweden, based on interviews of women in early pregnancy, no such effect was found on the general malformation rate, but data for neural tube defects were scarce. Using data from the Swedish Medical Birth Register for the years 1995-2004, 20 891 women were identified who reported the use of folic acid in early pregnancy, but not of anticonvulsants. These women were compared to all other women who gave birth during the study period. Malformations in the infants born were identified from multiple sources. No reduction in the general malformation rate was seen among infants born to women who reported the use of folic acid (OR = 1.09, 95% CI 1.02-1.17) and no effect of neural tube defect rate was seen (RR = 1.35, 95% CI 0.82-2.22), based on 16 infants with neural tube defect whose mother reported the use of folic acid. No effect was seen on the rates of other malformations except for cardiac defects, where a statistically significant increased risk (notably for severe defects) was found (OR = 1.19, 95% CI 1.05-1.35). The effect of various deficiencies in data collection is discussed, but is unlikely to explain the lack of protective effect noticed. So far, it has not been possible to demonstrate a beneficial effect of folic acid supplementation on malformation risk in Sweden. A more complete ascertainment and detailed timing and dosage of folic acid use in a prospective study is recommended.},
  author       = {Källén, Bengt},
  issn         = {0914-3505},
  keyword      = {supplementation,register,congenital malformation,folic acid,neural tube defect},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {119--124},
  publisher    = {Japanese Teratology Society},
  series       = {Congenital Anomalies},
  title        = {Congenital malformations in infants whose mothers reported the use of folic acid in early pregnancy in Sweden. A prospective population study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1741-4520.2007.00159.x},
  volume       = {47},
  year         = {2007},
}