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Transfemoral amputees' experiences of the first meeting and subsequent interactions with hospital staff

Sjödahl Hammarlund, Catharina LU ; Gard, Gunvor LU and Jarnlo, Gun-Britt LU (2008) In Disability and Rehabilitation 30(16). p.1192-1203
Abstract
Purpose. To describe, by use of a phenomenological approach, how transfemoral amputees experience their first meeting and subsequent interaction with hospital staff in the acute phase, in the long term and suggestions for future care-giving. Method. Eleven transfemoral amputees, median age 33.5 years, were interviewed. The amputations, performed in median 7.5 years before the interview, were caused by tumour, motorcycle accidents or work-related traumas. The participants were community dwelling and managed well indoors. All, except one, worked or studied full time. The interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Results. Three themes emerged: (i) Communication/information - limitations in preparing the patient for the new... (More)
Purpose. To describe, by use of a phenomenological approach, how transfemoral amputees experience their first meeting and subsequent interaction with hospital staff in the acute phase, in the long term and suggestions for future care-giving. Method. Eleven transfemoral amputees, median age 33.5 years, were interviewed. The amputations, performed in median 7.5 years before the interview, were caused by tumour, motorcycle accidents or work-related traumas. The participants were community dwelling and managed well indoors. All, except one, worked or studied full time. The interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Results. Three themes emerged: (i) Communication/information - limitations in preparing the patient for the new situation, (ii) empathy and emotional support, and (iii) ability to meet the need of individually tailored rehabilitation. For future care-giving three categories emerged: (i) Individually tailored communication/information, (ii) rehabilitation to be prepared to adapt to one's new situation, and (iii) support in regaining control. Conclusion. The participants expressed a need for both professional and emotional support in the acute phase. Over time they preferred a patient-centred approach which improved coping skills and facilitated their own ability to gain control. Increased awareness of how meeting and interacting with hospital staff influences rehabilitation processes may further improve patient satisfaction and outcomes. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
patient experience, information, Meeting, interaction, amputation
in
Disability and Rehabilitation
volume
30
issue
16
pages
1192 - 1203
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • pmid:17852247
  • wos:000259196800004
  • scopus:52049126711
ISSN
0963-8288
DOI
10.1080/09638280701521683
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
7c219c25-d7f2-44d1-8911-e5f9f22661be (old id 1139564)
date added to LUP
2008-08-20 14:09:45
date last changed
2017-05-14 03:28:15
@article{7c219c25-d7f2-44d1-8911-e5f9f22661be,
  abstract     = {Purpose. To describe, by use of a phenomenological approach, how transfemoral amputees experience their first meeting and subsequent interaction with hospital staff in the acute phase, in the long term and suggestions for future care-giving. Method. Eleven transfemoral amputees, median age 33.5 years, were interviewed. The amputations, performed in median 7.5 years before the interview, were caused by tumour, motorcycle accidents or work-related traumas. The participants were community dwelling and managed well indoors. All, except one, worked or studied full time. The interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Results. Three themes emerged: (i) Communication/information - limitations in preparing the patient for the new situation, (ii) empathy and emotional support, and (iii) ability to meet the need of individually tailored rehabilitation. For future care-giving three categories emerged: (i) Individually tailored communication/information, (ii) rehabilitation to be prepared to adapt to one's new situation, and (iii) support in regaining control. Conclusion. The participants expressed a need for both professional and emotional support in the acute phase. Over time they preferred a patient-centred approach which improved coping skills and facilitated their own ability to gain control. Increased awareness of how meeting and interacting with hospital staff influences rehabilitation processes may further improve patient satisfaction and outcomes.},
  author       = {Sjödahl Hammarlund, Catharina and Gard, Gunvor and Jarnlo, Gun-Britt},
  issn         = {0963-8288},
  keyword      = {patient experience,information,Meeting,interaction,amputation},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {16},
  pages        = {1192--1203},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Disability and Rehabilitation},
  title        = {Transfemoral amputees' experiences of the first meeting and subsequent interactions with hospital staff},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09638280701521683},
  volume       = {30},
  year         = {2008},
}