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3-Hydroxy fatty acids in faeces of patients with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis as a non-invasive diagnostic approach

de la Cochetiére, Marie France; Rougé, Carol; Szponar, Bogumila; Larsson, Lennart LU and Potel, Gilles (2007) In Microbial Ecology in Health and Disease 19. p.1-6
Abstract
The microbiota is part of the gastrointestinal ecosystem. A more detailed understanding should provide insight into multiple human disease states. This study investigated inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis). Previous analyses have suggested a role of gram-negative bacteria including Escherichia coli. An integrated procedure is presented where gas chromatography-mass spectrometry is used to determine chemical markers of gram-negative bacterial lipopolysaccharide (3-hydroxy fatty acids with 10-18 carbon atoms) in faecal samples. Six patients with Crohn's disease (CD), five with ulcerative colitis (UC) and six healthy adults were chosen as groups of interest. Nine saturated straight-chain 3-OH fatty acids of... (More)
The microbiota is part of the gastrointestinal ecosystem. A more detailed understanding should provide insight into multiple human disease states. This study investigated inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis). Previous analyses have suggested a role of gram-negative bacteria including Escherichia coli. An integrated procedure is presented where gas chromatography-mass spectrometry is used to determine chemical markers of gram-negative bacterial lipopolysaccharide (3-hydroxy fatty acids with 10-18 carbon atoms) in faecal samples. Six patients with Crohn's disease (CD), five with ulcerative colitis (UC) and six healthy adults were chosen as groups of interest. Nine saturated straight-chain 3-OH fatty acids of 10-18 carbon chain lengths and six iso- and anteiso-branched-chain 3-OH fatty acids of 15-18 carbon chain lengths were detected. Significant differences were found in the 3-OH n-C17:0, 3-OH i-C18:0 and 3-OH n-C18:0 composition of faeces. The present study therefore confirms that alteration of the composition of the endogenous gram-negative microbiota may be of importance in inflammatory bowel disease and those alterations could be detected with a non-invasive chemical-analytical approach. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
faecal microbiota, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, inflammatory bowel diseases
in
Microbial Ecology in Health and Disease
volume
19
pages
1 - 6
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • scopus:34147102344
ISSN
0891-060X
DOI
10.1080/08910600601132615
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9d774cb8-17ad-47b5-aac3-122c739f142e (old id 1140301)
date added to LUP
2008-08-25 09:52:57
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:38:39
@article{9d774cb8-17ad-47b5-aac3-122c739f142e,
  abstract     = {The microbiota is part of the gastrointestinal ecosystem. A more detailed understanding should provide insight into multiple human disease states. This study investigated inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis). Previous analyses have suggested a role of gram-negative bacteria including Escherichia coli. An integrated procedure is presented where gas chromatography-mass spectrometry is used to determine chemical markers of gram-negative bacterial lipopolysaccharide (3-hydroxy fatty acids with 10-18 carbon atoms) in faecal samples. Six patients with Crohn's disease (CD), five with ulcerative colitis (UC) and six healthy adults were chosen as groups of interest. Nine saturated straight-chain 3-OH fatty acids of 10-18 carbon chain lengths and six iso- and anteiso-branched-chain 3-OH fatty acids of 15-18 carbon chain lengths were detected. Significant differences were found in the 3-OH n-C17:0, 3-OH i-C18:0 and 3-OH n-C18:0 composition of faeces. The present study therefore confirms that alteration of the composition of the endogenous gram-negative microbiota may be of importance in inflammatory bowel disease and those alterations could be detected with a non-invasive chemical-analytical approach.},
  author       = {de la Cochetiére, Marie France and Rougé, Carol and Szponar, Bogumila and Larsson, Lennart and Potel, Gilles},
  issn         = {0891-060X},
  keyword      = {faecal microbiota,gas chromatography-mass spectrometry,inflammatory bowel diseases},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {1--6},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Microbial Ecology in Health and Disease},
  title        = {3-Hydroxy fatty acids in faeces of patients with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis as a non-invasive diagnostic approach},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08910600601132615},
  volume       = {19},
  year         = {2007},
}