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Non-neurological surgery results in a neurochemical stress response

Anckarsater, R; Zetterberg, H; Mansson, J-E; Blennow, K and Anckarsäter, Henrik LU (2008) In Journal of Neural Transmission 115(3). p.397-399
Abstract
There is a paucity of studies assessing changes in measures of human neurotransmission during stressful events, such as surgery. Thirty-five patients without any neurological disorders undergoing knee replacements with spinal bupivacaine anaesthesia and propofol sedation had cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drawn from a spinal catheter before, three hours after and the morning after surgery. The CSF concentrations of the dopamine metabolite homovanillinic acid (HVA) and the serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), which are related to the activity of the dopaminergic and serotonergic systems of the brain, increased sharply during surgery and reached 188% and 166% of their initial concentrations on the morning after the... (More)
There is a paucity of studies assessing changes in measures of human neurotransmission during stressful events, such as surgery. Thirty-five patients without any neurological disorders undergoing knee replacements with spinal bupivacaine anaesthesia and propofol sedation had cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drawn from a spinal catheter before, three hours after and the morning after surgery. The CSF concentrations of the dopamine metabolite homovanillinic acid (HVA) and the serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), which are related to the activity of the dopaminergic and serotonergic systems of the brain, increased sharply during surgery and reached 188% and 166% of their initial concentrations on the morning after the intervention (p < 0.0001). The CSF concentrations of the norepinephrine metabolite 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglucol (MHPG) increased modestly (non-significantly) during and after surgery. The HVA/5-HIAA ratios initially increased but returned to the initial level during the night after surgery. We conclude that non-neurological surgery, in this case to the lower limb, is accompanied by a marked central nervous stress response in spite of a spinal blockade. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
stress, propofol, spinal anaesthesia, Catecholamines, serotonin, cerebrospinal fluid
in
Journal of Neural Transmission
volume
115
issue
3
pages
397 - 399
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000253995700003
  • scopus:40949153440
ISSN
0300-9564
DOI
10.1007/s00702-007-0849-7
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c3ad65c1-cef7-496c-9fdc-a370048f3f70 (old id 1144134)
date added to LUP
2008-04-24 12:55:28
date last changed
2017-01-01 05:55:47
@article{c3ad65c1-cef7-496c-9fdc-a370048f3f70,
  abstract     = {There is a paucity of studies assessing changes in measures of human neurotransmission during stressful events, such as surgery. Thirty-five patients without any neurological disorders undergoing knee replacements with spinal bupivacaine anaesthesia and propofol sedation had cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drawn from a spinal catheter before, three hours after and the morning after surgery. The CSF concentrations of the dopamine metabolite homovanillinic acid (HVA) and the serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), which are related to the activity of the dopaminergic and serotonergic systems of the brain, increased sharply during surgery and reached 188% and 166% of their initial concentrations on the morning after the intervention (p &lt; 0.0001). The CSF concentrations of the norepinephrine metabolite 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglucol (MHPG) increased modestly (non-significantly) during and after surgery. The HVA/5-HIAA ratios initially increased but returned to the initial level during the night after surgery. We conclude that non-neurological surgery, in this case to the lower limb, is accompanied by a marked central nervous stress response in spite of a spinal blockade.},
  author       = {Anckarsater, R and Zetterberg, H and Mansson, J-E and Blennow, K and Anckarsäter, Henrik},
  issn         = {0300-9564},
  keyword      = {stress,propofol,spinal anaesthesia,Catecholamines,serotonin,cerebrospinal fluid},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {397--399},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Journal of Neural Transmission},
  title        = {Non-neurological surgery results in a neurochemical stress response},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00702-007-0849-7},
  volume       = {115},
  year         = {2008},
}