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Herniographic findings in athletes with unclear groin pain.

Kesek, Pavel LU ; Ekberg, Olle LU and Westlin, N (2002) In Acta Radiologica 43(6). p.603-608
Abstract
Background:Groin pain in athletes is a common symptom and may, among many other entities, be caused by skeletal changes in the symphysis and the pubic bone or hernia.



Material and Methods:Herniographies in 51 athletes - mainly soccer players - with unclear groin pain were reviewed. The prevalence of various hernias and skeletal changes at the symphysis and os pubis was registered. A questionnaire was also sent to the patients 3-20 years after the herniography.



Results:A hernia was found in 13 patients. Four patients had an indirect inguinal hernia. Eight patients had a direct inguinal hernia and 1 had an obturator hernia. The prevalence of direct inguinal hernia was higher than expected in young men.... (More)
Background:Groin pain in athletes is a common symptom and may, among many other entities, be caused by skeletal changes in the symphysis and the pubic bone or hernia.



Material and Methods:Herniographies in 51 athletes - mainly soccer players - with unclear groin pain were reviewed. The prevalence of various hernias and skeletal changes at the symphysis and os pubis was registered. A questionnaire was also sent to the patients 3-20 years after the herniography.



Results:A hernia was found in 13 patients. Four patients had an indirect inguinal hernia. Eight patients had a direct inguinal hernia and 1 had an obturator hernia. The prevalence of direct inguinal hernia was higher than expected in young men. This may be explained by strain at physical exercise. Bone changes at the pubic symphysis were found in 32 patients, 21 of whom had advanced changes.



Conclusion:A hernia can be found with herniography in one-fourth of athletes with long-standing unclear groin pain. Therefore herniography should be included in the diagnostic procedure. Lesions of the symphysis may be the result of strain of tendons, ligaments and fascias. This may predispose for an inguinal hernia as well. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Hernia, Inguinal: complications, Groin, Femoral: radiography, Chronic Disease, Athletic Injuries: radiography, Athletic Injuries: complications, Adult, Adolescent, Femoral: complications, Inguinal: radiography, Obturator: complications, Obturator: radiography, Human, Male, Middle Age, Pain: etiology
in
Acta Radiologica
volume
43
issue
6
pages
603 - 608
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • pmid:12485259
  • wos:000179908900012
  • scopus:0036827097
ISSN
1600-0455
DOI
10.1034/j.1600-0455.2002.430612.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
556b7c79-ea80-4842-b423-080e9c5d081c (old id 114605)
date added to LUP
2007-07-24 15:24:52
date last changed
2017-01-01 06:56:03
@article{556b7c79-ea80-4842-b423-080e9c5d081c,
  abstract     = {Background:Groin pain in athletes is a common symptom and may, among many other entities, be caused by skeletal changes in the symphysis and the pubic bone or hernia.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Material and Methods:Herniographies in 51 athletes - mainly soccer players - with unclear groin pain were reviewed. The prevalence of various hernias and skeletal changes at the symphysis and os pubis was registered. A questionnaire was also sent to the patients 3-20 years after the herniography.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Results:A hernia was found in 13 patients. Four patients had an indirect inguinal hernia. Eight patients had a direct inguinal hernia and 1 had an obturator hernia. The prevalence of direct inguinal hernia was higher than expected in young men. This may be explained by strain at physical exercise. Bone changes at the pubic symphysis were found in 32 patients, 21 of whom had advanced changes.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Conclusion:A hernia can be found with herniography in one-fourth of athletes with long-standing unclear groin pain. Therefore herniography should be included in the diagnostic procedure. Lesions of the symphysis may be the result of strain of tendons, ligaments and fascias. This may predispose for an inguinal hernia as well.},
  author       = {Kesek, Pavel and Ekberg, Olle and Westlin, N},
  issn         = {1600-0455},
  keyword      = {Hernia,Inguinal: complications,Groin,Femoral: radiography,Chronic Disease,Athletic Injuries: radiography,Athletic Injuries: complications,Adult,Adolescent,Femoral: complications,Inguinal: radiography,Obturator: complications,Obturator: radiography,Human,Male,Middle Age,Pain: etiology},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {603--608},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Acta Radiologica},
  title        = {Herniographic findings in athletes with unclear groin pain.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1034/j.1600-0455.2002.430612.x},
  volume       = {43},
  year         = {2002},
}