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Native, amyloid fibrils and beta-oligomers of the C-terminal domain of human prion protein display differential activation of complement and bind C1q, factor H and C4b-binding protein directly.

Holmér, Andreas LU ; Nyström, Sofie; Hammarström, Per and Blom, Anna LU (2008) In Molecular Immunology 45. p.3213-3221
Abstract
Prion protein (PrP) is an endogenous protein involved in the pathogenesis of bovine spongiform encephalopathy and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Murine PrP has been reported to bind C1q and activate the classical pathway of complement in a copper-dependent manner. Here we show that various conformational isoforms (native, amyloid fibrils, and beta-oligomers) of recombinant human PrP (90-231 and 121-231) bind C1q and activate complement. PrP binds both the globular head and collagenous stalk domains of C1q. Native, beta-oligomeric and amyloid fibrils of PrP all activate the classical and alternative pathways of complement to different extent. However, they do not trigger the lectin pathway. Of the tested PrP conformational isoforms we find that... (More)
Prion protein (PrP) is an endogenous protein involved in the pathogenesis of bovine spongiform encephalopathy and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Murine PrP has been reported to bind C1q and activate the classical pathway of complement in a copper-dependent manner. Here we show that various conformational isoforms (native, amyloid fibrils, and beta-oligomers) of recombinant human PrP (90-231 and 121-231) bind C1q and activate complement. PrP binds both the globular head and collagenous stalk domains of C1q. Native, beta-oligomeric and amyloid fibrils of PrP all activate the classical and alternative pathways of complement to different extent. However, they do not trigger the lectin pathway. Of the tested PrP conformational isoforms we find that beta-oligomers bind C1q and activate complement most strongly. Membrane attack complex formation initiated by PrP is subdued in comparison to deposition of early complement components. This is most likely attributed to the interaction between human PrP and complement inhibitors factor H and C4b-binding protein. Accordingly, PrP-triggered complement activation in the terminal pathway was increased in serum lacking C4b-binding protein. Taken together the present study indicates that complement activation may be an important factor in human prion diseases, suggesting that complement induced activities may prove relevant therapeutic targets. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Molecular Immunology
volume
45
pages
3213 - 3221
publisher
Pergamon
external identifiers
  • wos:000257024800023
  • pmid:18406463
  • scopus:43449086676
ISSN
1872-9142
DOI
10.1016/j.molimm.2008.02.023
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
baf8eb36-8acd-4c82-891a-24501f12b864 (old id 1147434)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18406463?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2008-05-07 14:51:28
date last changed
2017-04-16 04:26:24
@article{baf8eb36-8acd-4c82-891a-24501f12b864,
  abstract     = {Prion protein (PrP) is an endogenous protein involved in the pathogenesis of bovine spongiform encephalopathy and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Murine PrP has been reported to bind C1q and activate the classical pathway of complement in a copper-dependent manner. Here we show that various conformational isoforms (native, amyloid fibrils, and beta-oligomers) of recombinant human PrP (90-231 and 121-231) bind C1q and activate complement. PrP binds both the globular head and collagenous stalk domains of C1q. Native, beta-oligomeric and amyloid fibrils of PrP all activate the classical and alternative pathways of complement to different extent. However, they do not trigger the lectin pathway. Of the tested PrP conformational isoforms we find that beta-oligomers bind C1q and activate complement most strongly. Membrane attack complex formation initiated by PrP is subdued in comparison to deposition of early complement components. This is most likely attributed to the interaction between human PrP and complement inhibitors factor H and C4b-binding protein. Accordingly, PrP-triggered complement activation in the terminal pathway was increased in serum lacking C4b-binding protein. Taken together the present study indicates that complement activation may be an important factor in human prion diseases, suggesting that complement induced activities may prove relevant therapeutic targets.},
  author       = {Holmér, Andreas and Nyström, Sofie and Hammarström, Per and Blom, Anna},
  issn         = {1872-9142},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {3213--3221},
  publisher    = {Pergamon},
  series       = {Molecular Immunology},
  title        = {Native, amyloid fibrils and beta-oligomers of the C-terminal domain of human prion protein display differential activation of complement and bind C1q, factor H and C4b-binding protein directly.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.molimm.2008.02.023},
  volume       = {45},
  year         = {2008},
}