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Träning ökar benmassan hos barn men bara obetydligt hos vuxna

Karlsson, Magnus LU (2002) In Läkartidningen 99(35). p.3400-3405
Abstract
Data supporting the notion that exercise during growth built a stronger skeleton is compelling. Exercise during growth, especially during the pre-pubertal years, increases bone mineral density (BMD) and perhaps also bone size, each independently conferring bone strength. In adulthood, exercise at best halts bone loss or increases BMD by a few percentage points, an increase of questionable biological significance. High lifelong work load and high leisure time activity level are associated with high BMD. The Achilles heel of exercise is its cessation. Most BMD benefits achieved by exercise during growth are lost with cessation of exercise. Exercise at a lower level, after a period of high intense activity, may retain residual BMD benefits... (More)
Data supporting the notion that exercise during growth built a stronger skeleton is compelling. Exercise during growth, especially during the pre-pubertal years, increases bone mineral density (BMD) and perhaps also bone size, each independently conferring bone strength. In adulthood, exercise at best halts bone loss or increases BMD by a few percentage points, an increase of questionable biological significance. High lifelong work load and high leisure time activity level are associated with high BMD. The Achilles heel of exercise is its cessation. Most BMD benefits achieved by exercise during growth are lost with cessation of exercise. Exercise at a lower level, after a period of high intense activity, may retain residual BMD benefits into old age. A reduced rate of fragility fractures in the population could perhaps be achieved by promoting a physically active lifestyle with lifelong high activity level during work and leisure time, leading to high BMD and fewer fractures. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
alternative title
Exercise increases bone mass in children but only insignificantly in adults
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Aged, Age Factors, Adult, Adolescent, Prospective Studies, Male, Human, Spontaneous: prevention & control, Fractures, Spontaneous: etiology, Middle Age, Physical Education and Training, Osteoporosis: complications, Osteoporosis: prevention & control, Female, Exercise: physiology, Controlled Clinical Trials, Child, Comparative Study, Bone Development: physiology, Bone Density: physiology, English Abstract
in
Läkartidningen
volume
99
issue
35
pages
3400 - 3405
publisher
Swedish Medical Association
external identifiers
  • pmid:12362763
  • scopus:0037194741
ISSN
0023-7205
language
Swedish
LU publication?
yes
id
0defb5b7-ceb3-4330-a354-66348bebb3ed (old id 114815)
alternative location
http://ltarkiv.lakartidningen.se/artNo25285
date added to LUP
2007-07-24 14:13:48
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:21:18
@article{0defb5b7-ceb3-4330-a354-66348bebb3ed,
  abstract     = {Data supporting the notion that exercise during growth built a stronger skeleton is compelling. Exercise during growth, especially during the pre-pubertal years, increases bone mineral density (BMD) and perhaps also bone size, each independently conferring bone strength. In adulthood, exercise at best halts bone loss or increases BMD by a few percentage points, an increase of questionable biological significance. High lifelong work load and high leisure time activity level are associated with high BMD. The Achilles heel of exercise is its cessation. Most BMD benefits achieved by exercise during growth are lost with cessation of exercise. Exercise at a lower level, after a period of high intense activity, may retain residual BMD benefits into old age. A reduced rate of fragility fractures in the population could perhaps be achieved by promoting a physically active lifestyle with lifelong high activity level during work and leisure time, leading to high BMD and fewer fractures.},
  author       = {Karlsson, Magnus},
  issn         = {0023-7205},
  keyword      = {Aged,Age Factors,Adult,Adolescent,Prospective Studies,Male,Human,Spontaneous: prevention & control,Fractures,Spontaneous: etiology,Middle Age,Physical Education and Training,Osteoporosis: complications,Osteoporosis: prevention & control,Female,Exercise: physiology,Controlled Clinical Trials,Child,Comparative Study,Bone Development: physiology,Bone Density: physiology,English Abstract},
  language     = {swe},
  number       = {35},
  pages        = {3400--3405},
  publisher    = {Swedish Medical Association},
  series       = {Läkartidningen},
  title        = {Träning ökar benmassan hos barn men bara obetydligt hos vuxna},
  volume       = {99},
  year         = {2002},
}