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Detecting violations of sensory expectancies following cerebellar degeneration:

Moberget, Torgeir; Karns, Christina M.; Deouell, Leon Y.; Lindgren, Magnus LU ; Knight, Robert T. and Ivry, Richard B. (2008) In Neuropsychologia 46(10). p.2569-2579
Abstract
Two hypotheses concerning cerebellar function and predictive behavior are the sensory prediction

hypothesis and the timing hypothesis. The former postulates that the cerebellum is critical in generating

expectancies regarding forthcoming sensory information. The latter postulates that this structure

is critical in generating expectancies that are precisely timed; for example, the expected duration of an

event or the time between events. As such, the timing hypothesis constitutes a more specific form of prediction.

The present experiment contrasted these two hypotheses by examining the mismatch negativity

(MMN) response in patients with cerebellar cortical atrophy and matched controls.... (More)
Two hypotheses concerning cerebellar function and predictive behavior are the sensory prediction

hypothesis and the timing hypothesis. The former postulates that the cerebellum is critical in generating

expectancies regarding forthcoming sensory information. The latter postulates that this structure

is critical in generating expectancies that are precisely timed; for example, the expected duration of an

event or the time between events. As such, the timing hypothesis constitutes a more specific form of prediction.

The present experiment contrasted these two hypotheses by examining the mismatch negativity

(MMN) response in patients with cerebellar cortical atrophy and matched controls. While watching a

silent movie, a stream of task-irrelevant sounds was presented. A standard sound was presented 60% of

the time, whereas the remaining sounds deviated from the standard on one of four dimensions: duration,

intensity, pitch, or location. The timing between stimuli was either periodic or aperiodic. Based on the

sensory prediction hypothesis, the MMN for the patients should be abnormal across all four dimensions.

In contrast, the timing hypothesis would predict a selective impairment of the duration MMN. Moreover,

the timing hypothesis would also predict that the enhancement of the MMN observed in controls when

the stimuli are presented periodically should be attenuated in the patients. Compared to controls, the

patients exhibited a delayed latency in the MMN to duration deviants and a similar trend for the intensity

deviants, while pitch and location MMNs did not differ between groups. Periodicity had limited and

somewhat inconsistent effects. The present results are at odds with a general role for the cerebellum in

sensory prediction and provide partial support for the timing hypothesis. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Cerebellum Sensory prediction Timing MMN Event-related potentials Audition
in
Neuropsychologia
volume
46
issue
10
pages
2569 - 2579
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000257679100013
  • scopus:44649116393
ISSN
1873-3514
DOI
10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2008.03.016
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
aa2ef932-571a-4366-b98e-04abeaf735d6 (old id 1157159)
alternative location
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/00283932
date added to LUP
2008-07-03 08:22:09
date last changed
2017-09-10 03:41:56
@article{aa2ef932-571a-4366-b98e-04abeaf735d6,
  abstract     = {Two hypotheses concerning cerebellar function and predictive behavior are the sensory prediction<br/><br>
hypothesis and the timing hypothesis. The former postulates that the cerebellum is critical in generating<br/><br>
expectancies regarding forthcoming sensory information. The latter postulates that this structure<br/><br>
is critical in generating expectancies that are precisely timed; for example, the expected duration of an<br/><br>
event or the time between events. As such, the timing hypothesis constitutes a more specific form of prediction.<br/><br>
The present experiment contrasted these two hypotheses by examining the mismatch negativity<br/><br>
(MMN) response in patients with cerebellar cortical atrophy and matched controls. While watching a<br/><br>
silent movie, a stream of task-irrelevant sounds was presented. A standard sound was presented 60% of<br/><br>
the time, whereas the remaining sounds deviated from the standard on one of four dimensions: duration,<br/><br>
intensity, pitch, or location. The timing between stimuli was either periodic or aperiodic. Based on the<br/><br>
sensory prediction hypothesis, the MMN for the patients should be abnormal across all four dimensions.<br/><br>
In contrast, the timing hypothesis would predict a selective impairment of the duration MMN. Moreover,<br/><br>
the timing hypothesis would also predict that the enhancement of the MMN observed in controls when<br/><br>
the stimuli are presented periodically should be attenuated in the patients. Compared to controls, the<br/><br>
patients exhibited a delayed latency in the MMN to duration deviants and a similar trend for the intensity<br/><br>
deviants, while pitch and location MMNs did not differ between groups. Periodicity had limited and<br/><br>
somewhat inconsistent effects. The present results are at odds with a general role for the cerebellum in<br/><br>
sensory prediction and provide partial support for the timing hypothesis.},
  author       = {Moberget, Torgeir and Karns, Christina M. and Deouell, Leon Y. and Lindgren, Magnus and Knight, Robert T. and Ivry, Richard B.},
  issn         = {1873-3514},
  keyword      = {Cerebellum
Sensory prediction
Timing
MMN
Event-related potentials
Audition},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {2569--2579},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Neuropsychologia},
  title        = {Detecting violations of sensory expectancies following cerebellar degeneration:},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2008.03.016},
  volume       = {46},
  year         = {2008},
}