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Environmental influence on recovery after brain lesions--experimental and clinical data.

Johansson, Barbro LU (2003) In Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine2001-01-01+01:00 35(41 Suppl). p.41594-41594
Abstract
One aim of rehabilitation after brain lesions should be to optimise the function of the remaining intact brain. Experimental studies on focal cerebral infarcts in the rat have demonstrated that postischemic environmental enrichment significantly improves functional outcome, increases dendrite branching and number of dendritic spines in the contralateral cortex, influences expression of many genes and modifies lesion-induced stem cell differentiation in the hippocampus. Furthermore, environmental factors can interact with specific interventions such as necrotic grafting and drug treatment, which underlines the importance of general stimulation and activation in rehabilitation after brain damage. Animal laboratories often provide an... (More)
One aim of rehabilitation after brain lesions should be to optimise the function of the remaining intact brain. Experimental studies on focal cerebral infarcts in the rat have demonstrated that postischemic environmental enrichment significantly improves functional outcome, increases dendrite branching and number of dendritic spines in the contralateral cortex, influences expression of many genes and modifies lesion-induced stem cell differentiation in the hippocampus. Furthermore, environmental factors can interact with specific interventions such as necrotic grafting and drug treatment, which underlines the importance of general stimulation and activation in rehabilitation after brain damage. Animal laboratories often provide an environment with little stimulation. This should be taken into account when evaluating the clinical relevance of animal studies on long-term functional outcome after brain lesions. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
stem, cell differentiation, transplantation, functional outcome, plasticity, brain infarcts, dendritic spines
in
Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine2001-01-01+01:00
volume
35
issue
41 Suppl
pages
41594 - 41594
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000183336300003
  • scopus:80052705896
ISSN
1651-2081
DOI
10.1080/16501960310010089
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d341c187-81ee-45fc-812d-59194c9d0aec (old id 115810)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=12817651&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-05 14:27:37
date last changed
2018-05-29 10:14:02
@article{d341c187-81ee-45fc-812d-59194c9d0aec,
  abstract     = {One aim of rehabilitation after brain lesions should be to optimise the function of the remaining intact brain. Experimental studies on focal cerebral infarcts in the rat have demonstrated that postischemic environmental enrichment significantly improves functional outcome, increases dendrite branching and number of dendritic spines in the contralateral cortex, influences expression of many genes and modifies lesion-induced stem cell differentiation in the hippocampus. Furthermore, environmental factors can interact with specific interventions such as necrotic grafting and drug treatment, which underlines the importance of general stimulation and activation in rehabilitation after brain damage. Animal laboratories often provide an environment with little stimulation. This should be taken into account when evaluating the clinical relevance of animal studies on long-term functional outcome after brain lesions.},
  author       = {Johansson, Barbro},
  issn         = {1651-2081},
  keyword      = {stem,cell differentiation,transplantation,functional outcome,plasticity,brain infarcts,dendritic spines},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {41 Suppl},
  pages        = {41594--41594},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine2001-01-01+01:00},
  title        = {Environmental influence on recovery after brain lesions--experimental and clinical data.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/16501960310010089},
  volume       = {35},
  year         = {2003},
}