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Should tumor depth be included in prognostication of soft tissue sarcoma?

Rydholm, Anders LU and Gustafson, Pelle LU (2003) In BMC Cancer 3(1).
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Most staging systems for soft tissue sarcoma are based on histologic malignancy-grade, tumor size and tumor depth. These factors are generally dichotomized, size at 5 cm. We believe it is unlikely that tumor depth per se should influence a tumor's metastatic capability. Therefore we hypothesized that the unfavourable prognostic importance of depth could be explained by the close association between size and depth, deep-seated tumors on average being larger than the superficial ones. When tumor size is dichotomized, this effect should be most pronounced in the large size (>5 cm) group in which the size span is larger. METHODS: We analyzed the associations between tumor size and depth and the prognostic importance of grade,... (More)
BACKGROUND: Most staging systems for soft tissue sarcoma are based on histologic malignancy-grade, tumor size and tumor depth. These factors are generally dichotomized, size at 5 cm. We believe it is unlikely that tumor depth per se should influence a tumor's metastatic capability. Therefore we hypothesized that the unfavourable prognostic importance of depth could be explained by the close association between size and depth, deep-seated tumors on average being larger than the superficial ones. When tumor size is dichotomized, this effect should be most pronounced in the large size (>5 cm) group in which the size span is larger. METHODS: We analyzed the associations between tumor size and depth and the prognostic importance of grade, size and depth in a population-based series of 490 adult patients with soft tissue sarcoma of the extremity or trunk wall with complete, 4.5 years minimum, follow-up. RESULTS: Multivariate analysis showed no major prognostic effect of tumor depth when grade and size were taken into account. The mean size of small tumors was the same whether superficial or deep but the mean size of large and deep-seated tumors were one third larger than that of large but superficial tumors. Tumor depth influenced the prognosis in the subset of high-grade and large tumors. In this subset deep-seated tumors had poorer survival rate than superficial tumors, which could be explained by the larger mean size of the deep-seated tumors. CONCLUSION: Most of the prognostic value of tumor depth in soft tissue sarcomas of the extremity or trunk wall can be explained by the association between tumor size and depth. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
BMC Cancer
volume
3
issue
1
publisher
BioMed Central
external identifiers
  • wos:000183614600001
  • pmid:12769830
  • scopus:3042793636
ISSN
1471-2407
DOI
10.1186/1471-2407-3-17
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0e059c0d-0673-458d-a54c-991658ebb867 (old id 116298)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=12769830&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-04 09:02:12
date last changed
2018-10-03 11:48:51
@article{0e059c0d-0673-458d-a54c-991658ebb867,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: Most staging systems for soft tissue sarcoma are based on histologic malignancy-grade, tumor size and tumor depth. These factors are generally dichotomized, size at 5 cm. We believe it is unlikely that tumor depth per se should influence a tumor's metastatic capability. Therefore we hypothesized that the unfavourable prognostic importance of depth could be explained by the close association between size and depth, deep-seated tumors on average being larger than the superficial ones. When tumor size is dichotomized, this effect should be most pronounced in the large size (>5 cm) group in which the size span is larger. METHODS: We analyzed the associations between tumor size and depth and the prognostic importance of grade, size and depth in a population-based series of 490 adult patients with soft tissue sarcoma of the extremity or trunk wall with complete, 4.5 years minimum, follow-up. RESULTS: Multivariate analysis showed no major prognostic effect of tumor depth when grade and size were taken into account. The mean size of small tumors was the same whether superficial or deep but the mean size of large and deep-seated tumors were one third larger than that of large but superficial tumors. Tumor depth influenced the prognosis in the subset of high-grade and large tumors. In this subset deep-seated tumors had poorer survival rate than superficial tumors, which could be explained by the larger mean size of the deep-seated tumors. CONCLUSION: Most of the prognostic value of tumor depth in soft tissue sarcomas of the extremity or trunk wall can be explained by the association between tumor size and depth.},
  author       = {Rydholm, Anders and Gustafson, Pelle},
  issn         = {1471-2407},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  publisher    = {BioMed Central},
  series       = {BMC Cancer},
  title        = {Should tumor depth be included in prognostication of soft tissue sarcoma?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2407-3-17},
  volume       = {3},
  year         = {2003},
}