Advanced

Videoradiographic analysis of how carbonated thin liquids and thickened liquids affect the physiology of swallowing in subjects with aspiration on thin liquids.

Bülow, Margareta LU ; Olsson, Rolf LU and Ekberg, Olle LU (2003) In Acta Radiologica 44(4). p.366-372
Abstract
Purpose: To analyze how carbonated thin liquids affected the physiology of swallowing in dysphagic patients.



Material and Methods: 40 patients were analyzed; 36 were neurologically impaired. During a therapeutic videoradiographic swallowing examination the patients had to swallow liquids with the following consistencies three times: thin, thickened and carbonated. The liquids were given in doses of 3 x 5 ml. The swallows were analyzed regarding penetration/aspiration, pharyngeal transit time and pharyngeal retention.



Results: Significant difference was found regarding penetration/aspiration when comparisons were made between thin liquid and carbonated thin liquid (p<0.0001). Carbonated liquid... (More)
Purpose: To analyze how carbonated thin liquids affected the physiology of swallowing in dysphagic patients.



Material and Methods: 40 patients were analyzed; 36 were neurologically impaired. During a therapeutic videoradiographic swallowing examination the patients had to swallow liquids with the following consistencies three times: thin, thickened and carbonated. The liquids were given in doses of 3 x 5 ml. The swallows were analyzed regarding penetration/aspiration, pharyngeal transit time and pharyngeal retention.



Results: Significant difference was found regarding penetration/aspiration when comparisons were made between thin liquid and carbonated thin liquid (p<0.0001). Carbonated liquid reduced the penetration to the airways. The comparison between thin liquid and thickened liquid (p<0.0001) showed significant less penetration with thickened liquids. Pharyngeal transit time was reduced both when comparing thin liquid with thin carbonated liquid (p<0.0001) and thickened liquid (p<0.0001). Pharyngeal retention was significantly reduced (p<0.0001) with carbonated thin liquid compared to thickened liquid. The comparison of thin liquids and carbonated thin liquids showed p = 0.0013, thin and thickened liquids p = 0.0097.



Conclusions: Carbonated liquids reduced penetration/aspiration into the airways, reduced pharyngeal retention and pharyngeal transit time became shorter. Therefore, carbonated liquids are a valuable treatment option for patients with penetration/aspiration. Thickened liquids may still be an option for patients who cannot tolerate carbonated liquids and liquids with this consistency are safer than thin liquids. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Acta Radiologica
volume
44
issue
4
pages
366 - 372
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • wos:000183962100004
  • scopus:0042477664
ISSN
1600-0455
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a844fa94-b197-445f-a3ed-3fcd2c130c0e (old id 116528)
alternative location
http://dx.doi.org/10.1034/j.1600-0455.2003.00100.x
date added to LUP
2007-07-16 15:57:33
date last changed
2018-05-29 09:26:54
@article{a844fa94-b197-445f-a3ed-3fcd2c130c0e,
  abstract     = {Purpose: To analyze how carbonated thin liquids affected the physiology of swallowing in dysphagic patients.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Material and Methods: 40 patients were analyzed; 36 were neurologically impaired. During a therapeutic videoradiographic swallowing examination the patients had to swallow liquids with the following consistencies three times: thin, thickened and carbonated. The liquids were given in doses of 3 x 5 ml. The swallows were analyzed regarding penetration/aspiration, pharyngeal transit time and pharyngeal retention.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Results: Significant difference was found regarding penetration/aspiration when comparisons were made between thin liquid and carbonated thin liquid (p&lt;0.0001). Carbonated liquid reduced the penetration to the airways. The comparison between thin liquid and thickened liquid (p&lt;0.0001) showed significant less penetration with thickened liquids. Pharyngeal transit time was reduced both when comparing thin liquid with thin carbonated liquid (p&lt;0.0001) and thickened liquid (p&lt;0.0001). Pharyngeal retention was significantly reduced (p&lt;0.0001) with carbonated thin liquid compared to thickened liquid. The comparison of thin liquids and carbonated thin liquids showed p = 0.0013, thin and thickened liquids p = 0.0097.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Conclusions: Carbonated liquids reduced penetration/aspiration into the airways, reduced pharyngeal retention and pharyngeal transit time became shorter. Therefore, carbonated liquids are a valuable treatment option for patients with penetration/aspiration. Thickened liquids may still be an option for patients who cannot tolerate carbonated liquids and liquids with this consistency are safer than thin liquids.},
  author       = {Bülow, Margareta and Olsson, Rolf and Ekberg, Olle},
  issn         = {1600-0455},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {366--372},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Acta Radiologica},
  title        = {Videoradiographic analysis of how carbonated thin liquids and thickened liquids affect the physiology of swallowing in subjects with aspiration on thin liquids.},
  volume       = {44},
  year         = {2003},
}