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Gender differences in facial imitation and verbally reported emotional contagion from spontaneius to emotinally regulated processing levels

Sonnby-Borgström, Marianne LU ; Jönsson, Peter LU and Svensson, Owe LU (2008) In Scandinavian Journal of Psychology 49(2). p.111-122
Abstract
Previous studies on gender differences in facial imitation and verbally reported emotional contagion have investigated emotional responses to pictures of facial expressions at supraliminal exposure times. The aim of the present study was to investigate how gender differences are related to different exposure times, representing information processing levels from subliminal (spontaneous) to supraliminal (emotionally regulated). Further, the study aimed at exploring correlations between verbally reported emotional contagion and facial responses for men and women. Masked pictures of angry, happy and sad facial expressions were presented to 102 participants (51 men) at exposure times from subliminal (23 ms) to clearly supraliminal (2500 ms).... (More)
Previous studies on gender differences in facial imitation and verbally reported emotional contagion have investigated emotional responses to pictures of facial expressions at supraliminal exposure times. The aim of the present study was to investigate how gender differences are related to different exposure times, representing information processing levels from subliminal (spontaneous) to supraliminal (emotionally regulated). Further, the study aimed at exploring correlations between verbally reported emotional contagion and facial responses for men and women. Masked pictures of angry, happy and sad facial expressions were presented to 102 participants (51 men) at exposure times from subliminal (23 ms) to clearly supraliminal (2500 ms). Myoelectric activity (EMG) from the corrugator and the zygomaticus was measured and the participants reported their hedonic tone (verbally reported emotional contagion) after stimulus exposures. The results showed an effect of exposure time on gender differences in facial responses as well as in verbally reported emotional contagion. Women amplified imitative responses towards happy vs. angry faces and verbally reported emotional contagion with prolonged exposure times, whereas men did not. No gender differences were detected at the subliminal or borderliminal exposure times, but at the supraliminal exposure gender differences were found in imitation as well as in verbally reported emotional contagion. Women showed correspondence between their facial responses and their verbally reported emotional contagion to a greater extent than men. The results were interpreted in terms of gender differences in emotion regulation, rather than as differences in biologically prepared emotional reactivity. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Gender differences, facial imitation. emotinal contagion. empathy. emotion regulation
in
Scandinavian Journal of Psychology
volume
49
issue
2
pages
111 - 122
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000254127300002
  • scopus:40949122775
ISSN
1467-9450
DOI
10.1111/j.1467-9450.2008.00626.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
34360ea8-5fce-4182-bdd7-ca1b46993e20 (old id 1168129)
alternative location
http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/fulltext/119396535/PDFSTART
date added to LUP
2008-07-03 08:14:23
date last changed
2017-10-29 03:58:21
@article{34360ea8-5fce-4182-bdd7-ca1b46993e20,
  abstract     = {Previous studies on gender differences in facial imitation and verbally reported emotional contagion have investigated emotional responses to pictures of facial expressions at supraliminal exposure times. The aim of the present study was to investigate how gender differences are related to different exposure times, representing information processing levels from subliminal (spontaneous) to supraliminal (emotionally regulated). Further, the study aimed at exploring correlations between verbally reported emotional contagion and facial responses for men and women. Masked pictures of angry, happy and sad facial expressions were presented to 102 participants (51 men) at exposure times from subliminal (23 ms) to clearly supraliminal (2500 ms). Myoelectric activity (EMG) from the corrugator and the zygomaticus was measured and the participants reported their hedonic tone (verbally reported emotional contagion) after stimulus exposures. The results showed an effect of exposure time on gender differences in facial responses as well as in verbally reported emotional contagion. Women amplified imitative responses towards happy vs. angry faces and verbally reported emotional contagion with prolonged exposure times, whereas men did not. No gender differences were detected at the subliminal or borderliminal exposure times, but at the supraliminal exposure gender differences were found in imitation as well as in verbally reported emotional contagion. Women showed correspondence between their facial responses and their verbally reported emotional contagion to a greater extent than men. The results were interpreted in terms of gender differences in emotion regulation, rather than as differences in biologically prepared emotional reactivity.},
  author       = {Sonnby-Borgström, Marianne and Jönsson, Peter and Svensson, Owe},
  issn         = {1467-9450},
  keyword      = {Gender differences,facial imitation. emotinal contagion. empathy. emotion regulation},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {111--122},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Psychology},
  title        = {Gender differences in facial imitation and verbally reported emotional contagion from spontaneius to emotinally regulated processing levels},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9450.2008.00626.x},
  volume       = {49},
  year         = {2008},
}