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Factors with independent influence on the 'timed up and go' test in patients with hip fracture.

Tange Kristensen, Morten LU ; Foss, Nicolai Bang and Kehlet, Henrik (2008) In Physiotherapy Research International
Abstract
Background and Purpose. Data on performance times for the 'timed up and go' (TUG) test with analyses of factors, that eventually could affect the result in patients with hip fracture, have not been published to date. The aims of the present study, therefore, were to assess normative reference values of TUG performances and determine the influence of individual and clinical factors on TUG-test scores in patients with hip fracture. Method. In this prospective, descriptive study, a total of 196 consecutive patients over the age of 60, and able to perform the TUG when discharged directly to their own homes from a specialized orthopaedic hip fracture unit, were evaluated. The association between TUG scores and categorical variables were... (More)
Background and Purpose. Data on performance times for the 'timed up and go' (TUG) test with analyses of factors, that eventually could affect the result in patients with hip fracture, have not been published to date. The aims of the present study, therefore, were to assess normative reference values of TUG performances and determine the influence of individual and clinical factors on TUG-test scores in patients with hip fracture. Method. In this prospective, descriptive study, a total of 196 consecutive patients over the age of 60, and able to perform the TUG when discharged directly to their own homes from a specialized orthopaedic hip fracture unit, were evaluated. The association between TUG scores and categorical variables were examined, and linear regression was used to investigate the factors influencing performance times. Results. Univariate analysis showed significant differences between all categorical variables, except gender, but multivariate linear regression analyses showed that only a high pre-fracture function level, evaluated by the New Mobility Score (B = -11), was independently associated with having a good TUG score, while older age (B = 0.49), having an intertrochanteric fracture (B = 7), performing TUG with a walker (B = 15), and performing TUG in the later postoperative period (B = 0.39) were independently associated with having a poorer TUG score. Conclusions. These preliminary normative reference values of TUG performances in patients with hip fracture can be used as references, to which individuals can expect to perform. Multivariate testing suggests that clinicians should use age, pre-fracture function, fracture type and walking-aid specific data when interpreting the TUG test results. Physiotherapists should be aware of this if TUG scores are to be used predictively or as an outcome measure in patients with hip fracture, especially in research. Copyright (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
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organization
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
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in
Physiotherapy Research International
publisher
Whurr Publishing
external identifiers
  • pmid:18646243
  • scopus:65349166277
ISSN
1358-2267
DOI
10.1002/pri.414
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
3886be38-29cb-4eb7-b519-2aa8006506fd (old id 1180903)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18646243?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2008-08-11 11:47:33
date last changed
2017-07-23 04:53:44
@article{3886be38-29cb-4eb7-b519-2aa8006506fd,
  abstract     = {Background and Purpose. Data on performance times for the 'timed up and go' (TUG) test with analyses of factors, that eventually could affect the result in patients with hip fracture, have not been published to date. The aims of the present study, therefore, were to assess normative reference values of TUG performances and determine the influence of individual and clinical factors on TUG-test scores in patients with hip fracture. Method. In this prospective, descriptive study, a total of 196 consecutive patients over the age of 60, and able to perform the TUG when discharged directly to their own homes from a specialized orthopaedic hip fracture unit, were evaluated. The association between TUG scores and categorical variables were examined, and linear regression was used to investigate the factors influencing performance times. Results. Univariate analysis showed significant differences between all categorical variables, except gender, but multivariate linear regression analyses showed that only a high pre-fracture function level, evaluated by the New Mobility Score (B = -11), was independently associated with having a good TUG score, while older age (B = 0.49), having an intertrochanteric fracture (B = 7), performing TUG with a walker (B = 15), and performing TUG in the later postoperative period (B = 0.39) were independently associated with having a poorer TUG score. Conclusions. These preliminary normative reference values of TUG performances in patients with hip fracture can be used as references, to which individuals can expect to perform. Multivariate testing suggests that clinicians should use age, pre-fracture function, fracture type and walking-aid specific data when interpreting the TUG test results. Physiotherapists should be aware of this if TUG scores are to be used predictively or as an outcome measure in patients with hip fracture, especially in research. Copyright (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.},
  author       = {Tange Kristensen, Morten and Foss, Nicolai Bang and Kehlet, Henrik},
  issn         = {1358-2267},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {07},
  publisher    = {Whurr Publishing},
  series       = {Physiotherapy Research International},
  title        = {Factors with independent influence on the 'timed up and go' test in patients with hip fracture.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pri.414},
  year         = {2008},
}