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Pools and fluxes of carbon in three Norway spruce ecosystems along a climatic gradient in Sweden

Kleja, Dan Berggren; Svensson, Magnus; Majdi, Hooshang; Jansson, Per-Erik; Langvall, Ola; Bergkvist, Bo LU ; Johansson, Maj-Britt; Weslien, Per; Truusb, Laimi and Lindroth, Anders LU , et al. (2008) In Biogeochemistry 89(1). p.7-25
Abstract
This paper presents an integrated analysis of organic carbon (C) pools in soils and vegetation, within-ecosystem fluxes and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) in three 40-year old Norway spruce stands along a north-south climatic gradient in Sweden, measured 2001-2004. A process-orientated ecosystem model (CoupModel), previously parameterised on a regional dataset, was used for the analysis. Pools of soil organic carbon (SOC) and tree growth rates were highest at the southernmost site (1.6 and 2.0-fold, respectively). Tree litter production (litterfall and root litter) was also highest in the south, with about half coming from fine roots (< 1 mm) at all sites. However, when the litter input from the forest floor vegetation was included, the... (More)
This paper presents an integrated analysis of organic carbon (C) pools in soils and vegetation, within-ecosystem fluxes and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) in three 40-year old Norway spruce stands along a north-south climatic gradient in Sweden, measured 2001-2004. A process-orientated ecosystem model (CoupModel), previously parameterised on a regional dataset, was used for the analysis. Pools of soil organic carbon (SOC) and tree growth rates were highest at the southernmost site (1.6 and 2.0-fold, respectively). Tree litter production (litterfall and root litter) was also highest in the south, with about half coming from fine roots (< 1 mm) at all sites. However, when the litter input from the forest floor vegetation was included, the difference in total litter input rate between the sites almost disappeared (190-233 g C m(-2) year(-1)). We propose that a higher N deposition and N availability in the south result in a slower turnover of soil organic matter than in the north. This effect seems to overshadow the effect of temperature. At the southern site, 19% of the total litter input to the O horizon was leached to the mineral soil as dissolved organic carbon, while at the two northern sites the corresponding figure was approx. 9%. The CoupModel accurately described general C cycling behaviour in these ecosystems, reproducing the differences between north and south. The simulated changes in SOC pools during the measurement period were small, ranging from -8 g C m(-2) year(-1) in the north to +9 g C m(-2) year(-1) in the south. In contrast, NEE and tree growth measurements at the northernmost site suggest that the soil lost about 90 g C m(-2) year(-1). (Less)
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publication status
published
subject
keywords
soil carbon, climatic gradient, CoupModel, root, dissolved organic carbon, litter, boreal ecosystems
in
Biogeochemistry
volume
89
issue
1
pages
7 - 25
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000257201300002
  • scopus:46249089502
ISSN
1573-515X
DOI
10.1007/s10533-007-9136-9
project
Climate Initiative
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
dc11e2be-92ab-4917-b871-be074d2ea953 (old id 1187150)
date added to LUP
2008-09-05 09:24:57
date last changed
2017-09-10 03:36:43
@article{dc11e2be-92ab-4917-b871-be074d2ea953,
  abstract     = {This paper presents an integrated analysis of organic carbon (C) pools in soils and vegetation, within-ecosystem fluxes and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) in three 40-year old Norway spruce stands along a north-south climatic gradient in Sweden, measured 2001-2004. A process-orientated ecosystem model (CoupModel), previously parameterised on a regional dataset, was used for the analysis. Pools of soil organic carbon (SOC) and tree growth rates were highest at the southernmost site (1.6 and 2.0-fold, respectively). Tree litter production (litterfall and root litter) was also highest in the south, with about half coming from fine roots (&lt; 1 mm) at all sites. However, when the litter input from the forest floor vegetation was included, the difference in total litter input rate between the sites almost disappeared (190-233 g C m(-2) year(-1)). We propose that a higher N deposition and N availability in the south result in a slower turnover of soil organic matter than in the north. This effect seems to overshadow the effect of temperature. At the southern site, 19% of the total litter input to the O horizon was leached to the mineral soil as dissolved organic carbon, while at the two northern sites the corresponding figure was approx. 9%. The CoupModel accurately described general C cycling behaviour in these ecosystems, reproducing the differences between north and south. The simulated changes in SOC pools during the measurement period were small, ranging from -8 g C m(-2) year(-1) in the north to +9 g C m(-2) year(-1) in the south. In contrast, NEE and tree growth measurements at the northernmost site suggest that the soil lost about 90 g C m(-2) year(-1).},
  author       = {Kleja, Dan Berggren and Svensson, Magnus and Majdi, Hooshang and Jansson, Per-Erik and Langvall, Ola and Bergkvist, Bo and Johansson, Maj-Britt and Weslien, Per and Truusb, Laimi and Lindroth, Anders and Ågren, Göran I},
  issn         = {1573-515X},
  keyword      = {soil carbon,climatic gradient,CoupModel,root,dissolved organic carbon,litter,boreal ecosystems},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {7--25},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Biogeochemistry},
  title        = {Pools and fluxes of carbon in three Norway spruce ecosystems along a climatic gradient in Sweden},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10533-007-9136-9},
  volume       = {89},
  year         = {2008},
}