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Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposure, urinary mutagenicity, and DNA adducts in rubber manufacturing workers

Peters, Susan; Talaska, Glenn; Jönsson, Bo A LU ; Kromhout, Hans and Vermeulen, Roel (2008) In Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention 17(6). p.1452-1459
Abstract
Objectives: Several studies have suggested that genotoxic risks might still be present in the contemporary rubber manufacturing industry. Previously, we observed elevated levels of urinary mutagenicity and bladder DNA adducts in rubber workers. Presently, we investigated whether DNA adducts in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and/or urothelial cells may be caused by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons or other genotoxic compounds. Methods: Spot urine samples from 116 rubber manufacturing workers were collected on Sunday and during the workweek (post-shift) to determine 1-hydroxypyrene and mutagenicity levels. For 52 nonsmokers, urothelial cell DNA adducts and PBMC DNA adducts were measured additionally. Results: Urinary... (More)
Objectives: Several studies have suggested that genotoxic risks might still be present in the contemporary rubber manufacturing industry. Previously, we observed elevated levels of urinary mutagenicity and bladder DNA adducts in rubber workers. Presently, we investigated whether DNA adducts in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and/or urothelial cells may be caused by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons or other genotoxic compounds. Methods: Spot urine samples from 116 rubber manufacturing workers were collected on Sunday and during the workweek (post-shift) to determine 1-hydroxypyrene and mutagenicity levels. For 52 nonsmokers, urothelial cell DNA adducts and PBMC DNA adducts were measured additionally. Results: Urinary 1-hydroxypyrene levels were significantly higher in workweek samples compared with Sunday (P = 0.0001). This increase was not uniform across tasks and only reached statistical significance for the curing department (+99%; P = 0.003). Weekday urinary mutagenicity was significantly increased for mixing (+56%) and curing (+21%) workers when compared with that for Sunday. Total urothelial cell DNA adducts were related to urinary 1-hydroxypyrene (P = 0.021) and mutagenicity (P = 0.027). No significant relationship was found between the adduct levels in PBMC and urothelial cells or between the former and urinary 1-hydroxypyrene or mutagenicity. Conclusions: Workers in the compounding, mixing, and curing departments were at highest genotoxic risk among rubber manufacturing workers. Increased levels of urinary 1-hydroxypyrene, mutagenicity, and urothelial cell DNA adducts were found in these workers. Urothelial cell and PBMC DNA adducts were not related, hinting possibly to the presence of specific bladder carcinogens in the rubber manufacturing industry. (Less)
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention
volume
17
issue
6
pages
1452 - 1459
publisher
American Association for Cancer Research
external identifiers
  • wos:000256890900022
  • scopus:46949099586
ISSN
1538-7755
DOI
10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-07-2777
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0fdcf403-96e2-4d69-b6a7-e27dd0075ae4 (old id 1191154)
date added to LUP
2008-09-08 11:48:07
date last changed
2017-08-06 04:00:12
@article{0fdcf403-96e2-4d69-b6a7-e27dd0075ae4,
  abstract     = {Objectives: Several studies have suggested that genotoxic risks might still be present in the contemporary rubber manufacturing industry. Previously, we observed elevated levels of urinary mutagenicity and bladder DNA adducts in rubber workers. Presently, we investigated whether DNA adducts in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and/or urothelial cells may be caused by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons or other genotoxic compounds. Methods: Spot urine samples from 116 rubber manufacturing workers were collected on Sunday and during the workweek (post-shift) to determine 1-hydroxypyrene and mutagenicity levels. For 52 nonsmokers, urothelial cell DNA adducts and PBMC DNA adducts were measured additionally. Results: Urinary 1-hydroxypyrene levels were significantly higher in workweek samples compared with Sunday (P = 0.0001). This increase was not uniform across tasks and only reached statistical significance for the curing department (+99%; P = 0.003). Weekday urinary mutagenicity was significantly increased for mixing (+56%) and curing (+21%) workers when compared with that for Sunday. Total urothelial cell DNA adducts were related to urinary 1-hydroxypyrene (P = 0.021) and mutagenicity (P = 0.027). No significant relationship was found between the adduct levels in PBMC and urothelial cells or between the former and urinary 1-hydroxypyrene or mutagenicity. Conclusions: Workers in the compounding, mixing, and curing departments were at highest genotoxic risk among rubber manufacturing workers. Increased levels of urinary 1-hydroxypyrene, mutagenicity, and urothelial cell DNA adducts were found in these workers. Urothelial cell and PBMC DNA adducts were not related, hinting possibly to the presence of specific bladder carcinogens in the rubber manufacturing industry.},
  author       = {Peters, Susan and Talaska, Glenn and Jönsson, Bo A and Kromhout, Hans and Vermeulen, Roel},
  issn         = {1538-7755},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {1452--1459},
  publisher    = {American Association for Cancer Research},
  series       = {Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention},
  title        = {Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposure, urinary mutagenicity, and DNA adducts in rubber manufacturing workers},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-07-2777},
  volume       = {17},
  year         = {2008},
}