Advanced

Exercise limb blood flow response to acute and chronic hypoxia in Danish lowlanders and Aymara natives

Rådegran, Göran LU (2008) In Acta Physiologica 192(4). p.531-539
Abstract
Aim: The femoral artery blood flow response to submaximal, one-legged, dynamic, knee-extensor exercise was determined in acute and chronic hypoxia to investigate the hypotheses that with adaptation to chronic hypoxia blood haemoglobin increases, allowing preservation of blood flow as in normoxia. Methods: Sixteen Danish lowlanders participated, in groups of six to eight, in the experiments at sea level normoxia (FiO(2) congruent to 0.21) and acute hypoxia (FiO(2) congruent to 0.11), and chronic hypoxia after similar to 7 and 9-10 weeks at similar to 5260 m altitude breathing ambient air (FiO(2) congruent to 0.21) or a hyperoxic gas (FiO(2) congruent to 0.55). The response was compared with that in six Aymara natives. Results: The... (More)
Aim: The femoral artery blood flow response to submaximal, one-legged, dynamic, knee-extensor exercise was determined in acute and chronic hypoxia to investigate the hypotheses that with adaptation to chronic hypoxia blood haemoglobin increases, allowing preservation of blood flow as in normoxia. Methods: Sixteen Danish lowlanders participated, in groups of six to eight, in the experiments at sea level normoxia (FiO(2) congruent to 0.21) and acute hypoxia (FiO(2) congruent to 0.11), and chronic hypoxia after similar to 7 and 9-10 weeks at similar to 5260 m altitude breathing ambient air (FiO(2) congruent to 0.21) or a hyperoxic gas (FiO(2) congruent to 0.55). The response was compared with that in six Aymara natives. Results: The haemoglobin and haematocrit increased (P < 0.003) in the lowlanders at altitude vs. at sea level by similar to 39 and 27% respectively; i.e. to a similar (P = ns) level as in the natives. At rest, blood flow was the same (P = ns) in the lowlanders at sea level and altitude, as in the natives at altitude. During the onset of and incremental exercise, blood flow was the same (P = ns) in the lowlanders at sea level and altitude, as in the natives at altitude. Acute hypoxia increased (P < 0.05) blood flow by similar to 55% during exercise in the lowlanders at sea level. Acute hyperoxia decreased (P < 0.05) blood flow by similar to 22-29% during exercise in the lowlanders and natives at altitude. Conclusion: In chronic hypoxia, blood haemoglobin increases, allowing normalization of the elevated exercise blood flow response in acute hypoxia, and preservation of the kinetics and steady-state exercise blood flow as in normoxia, being similar as in the natives at altitude. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
oxygen, hyperoxia, hyperaemia, haemoglobin, altitude, Chacaltaya
in
Acta Physiologica
volume
192
issue
4
pages
531 - 539
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000253605900006
  • scopus:40049096174
ISSN
1748-1708
DOI
10.1111/j.1748-1716.2007.01768.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1f6385c4-4305-453c-8c9c-fb31dce46d04 (old id 1193892)
date added to LUP
2008-09-10 09:59:28
date last changed
2017-01-15 03:26:25
@article{1f6385c4-4305-453c-8c9c-fb31dce46d04,
  abstract     = {Aim: The femoral artery blood flow response to submaximal, one-legged, dynamic, knee-extensor exercise was determined in acute and chronic hypoxia to investigate the hypotheses that with adaptation to chronic hypoxia blood haemoglobin increases, allowing preservation of blood flow as in normoxia. Methods: Sixteen Danish lowlanders participated, in groups of six to eight, in the experiments at sea level normoxia (FiO(2) congruent to 0.21) and acute hypoxia (FiO(2) congruent to 0.11), and chronic hypoxia after similar to 7 and 9-10 weeks at similar to 5260 m altitude breathing ambient air (FiO(2) congruent to 0.21) or a hyperoxic gas (FiO(2) congruent to 0.55). The response was compared with that in six Aymara natives. Results: The haemoglobin and haematocrit increased (P &lt; 0.003) in the lowlanders at altitude vs. at sea level by similar to 39 and 27% respectively; i.e. to a similar (P = ns) level as in the natives. At rest, blood flow was the same (P = ns) in the lowlanders at sea level and altitude, as in the natives at altitude. During the onset of and incremental exercise, blood flow was the same (P = ns) in the lowlanders at sea level and altitude, as in the natives at altitude. Acute hypoxia increased (P &lt; 0.05) blood flow by similar to 55% during exercise in the lowlanders at sea level. Acute hyperoxia decreased (P &lt; 0.05) blood flow by similar to 22-29% during exercise in the lowlanders and natives at altitude. Conclusion: In chronic hypoxia, blood haemoglobin increases, allowing normalization of the elevated exercise blood flow response in acute hypoxia, and preservation of the kinetics and steady-state exercise blood flow as in normoxia, being similar as in the natives at altitude.},
  author       = {Rådegran, Göran},
  issn         = {1748-1708},
  keyword      = {oxygen,hyperoxia,hyperaemia,haemoglobin,altitude,Chacaltaya},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {531--539},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Acta Physiologica},
  title        = {Exercise limb blood flow response to acute and chronic hypoxia in Danish lowlanders and Aymara natives},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1748-1716.2007.01768.x},
  volume       = {192},
  year         = {2008},
}