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Unifying foundations - to be seen in the phenomenon of language

Löfgren, Lars LU (2004) In Foundations of Science 9(2). p.135-189
Abstract
Scientific knowledge develops in an increasingly fragmentary way. A multitude of scientific disciplines branch out. Curiosity for this development leads into quests for a unifying understanding. To a certain extent, foundational studies provide such unification. There is a tendency, however, also of a fragmentary growth of foundational studies, like in a multitude of disciplinary foundations. We suggest to look at the foundational problem, not primarily as a search for foundations for one discipline in another, as in some reductionist approach, but as a steady revelation of presuppositions for individual scientific theories -- which are bound to meet, sooner or later, in a common language. A decisive point here is our holistic conception... (More)
Scientific knowledge develops in an increasingly fragmentary way. A multitude of scientific disciplines branch out. Curiosity for this development leads into quests for a unifying understanding. To a certain extent, foundational studies provide such unification. There is a tendency, however, also of a fragmentary growth of foundational studies, like in a multitude of disciplinary foundations. We suggest to look at the foundational problem, not primarily as a search for foundations for one discipline in another, as in some reductionist approach, but as a steady revelation of presuppositions for individual scientific theories -- which are bound to meet, sooner or later, in a common language. A decisive point here is our holistic conception of language, as a whole of description-interpretation processes which are entangled (complementary) in the language itself. For every language there is a linguistic complementarity. We suggest this unique form of entanglement as a unifying presupposition, ultimately foundational for all communicable knowledge. Involved is a linguistic realism, in terms of which we critically examine "language-world" problems, as exposed by Wittgenstein, and Russell, about a foundational interdependence of language and reality (world). Throughout, we attach to the development of foundational studies of mathematics, logics, and the natural sciences. In particular, we study the interpretation problem for axioms of infinity in some detail. We emphasize that the holistic concept of language contradicts Carnap’s semiotic fragmentation thesis (thus, no clean cut between syntax, semantics, pragmatics).



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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
holistic language, linguistic realism, presupposition, unification, semiotics, fragmentation, foundational research, foundation, Wittgenstein’s language-world problem, linguistic complementarity
in
Foundations of Science
volume
9
issue
2
pages
135 - 189
publisher
Kluwer
ISSN
1233-1821
DOI
10.1023/B:FODA.0000025037.28557.ea
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ff68678b-41f7-4744-96f5-9fcf933f511f (old id 120374)
date added to LUP
2007-07-02 14:37:50
date last changed
2016-04-16 05:04:16
@article{ff68678b-41f7-4744-96f5-9fcf933f511f,
  abstract     = {Scientific knowledge develops in an increasingly fragmentary way. A multitude of scientific disciplines branch out. Curiosity for this development leads into quests for a unifying understanding. To a certain extent, foundational studies provide such unification. There is a tendency, however, also of a fragmentary growth of foundational studies, like in a multitude of disciplinary foundations. We suggest to look at the foundational problem, not primarily as a search for foundations for one discipline in another, as in some reductionist approach, but as a steady revelation of presuppositions for individual scientific theories -- which are bound to meet, sooner or later, in a common language. A decisive point here is our holistic conception of language, as a whole of description-interpretation processes which are entangled (complementary) in the language itself. For every language there is a linguistic complementarity. We suggest this unique form of entanglement as a unifying presupposition, ultimately foundational for all communicable knowledge. Involved is a linguistic realism, in terms of which we critically examine "language-world" problems, as exposed by Wittgenstein, and Russell, about a foundational interdependence of language and reality (world). Throughout, we attach to the development of foundational studies of mathematics, logics, and the natural sciences. In particular, we study the interpretation problem for axioms of infinity in some detail. We emphasize that the holistic concept of language contradicts Carnap’s semiotic fragmentation thesis (thus, no clean cut between syntax, semantics, pragmatics).<br/><br>
<br/><br>
This is the final, accepted and revised manuscript of this article. Use alternative location to go to the published version. Requires subscription.},
  author       = {Löfgren, Lars},
  issn         = {1233-1821},
  keyword      = {holistic language,linguistic realism,presupposition,unification,semiotics,fragmentation,foundational research,foundation,Wittgenstein’s language-world problem,linguistic complementarity},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {135--189},
  publisher    = {Kluwer},
  series       = {Foundations of Science},
  title        = {Unifying foundations - to be seen in the phenomenon of language},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/B:FODA.0000025037.28557.ea},
  volume       = {9},
  year         = {2004},
}