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The role of personal standards in clinically significant perfectionism. A person-oriented approach to the study of patterns of perfectionism

Lundh, Lars-Gunnar LU ; Saboonchi, Fredrik and Wångby, Margit LU (2008) In Cognitive Therapy and Research 32(3). p.333-350
Abstract
Clinically significant perfectionism is defined as patterns of perfectionism which are over-represented in clinical samples and under-represented in non-clinical samples. The present study contrasted two hypotheses about what characterizes clinically significant perfectionism: the two-factor theory and perfectionism/acceptance theory. First, a person-oriented approach by means of cluster analysis was used to identify typical patterns of perfectionism. These clusters were then cross-tabulated with two clinical samples (patients with social phobia and patients with panic disorder) and a non-clinical sample. The results showed that patterns of clinically significant perfectionism combined high Concern over Mistakes (CM) and Doubts about... (More)
Clinically significant perfectionism is defined as patterns of perfectionism which are over-represented in clinical samples and under-represented in non-clinical samples. The present study contrasted two hypotheses about what characterizes clinically significant perfectionism: the two-factor theory and perfectionism/acceptance theory. First, a person-oriented approach by means of cluster analysis was used to identify typical patterns of perfectionism. These clusters were then cross-tabulated with two clinical samples (patients with social phobia and patients with panic disorder) and a non-clinical sample. The results showed that patterns of clinically significant perfectionism combined high Concern over Mistakes (CM) and Doubts about Action (DA) with high Personal Standards (PS) (and to a lesser extent also high Organization)--which is consistent with perfectionism/acceptance theory, but at odds with the two-factor theory. The results illustrate the value of a person-oriented methodological approach as a complement to the traditional variable-oriented approach. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
person-oriented approach, depression, panic disorder, perfectionism, social phobia
in
Cognitive Therapy and Research
volume
32
issue
3
pages
333 - 350
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000255745000003
  • scopus:43549098275
ISSN
0147-5916
DOI
10.1007/s10608-006-9109-7
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9be69637-94a1-4afd-998f-a4a47b3caeae (old id 1204253)
date added to LUP
2008-09-17 12:36:49
date last changed
2017-01-01 05:10:26
@article{9be69637-94a1-4afd-998f-a4a47b3caeae,
  abstract     = {Clinically significant perfectionism is defined as patterns of perfectionism which are over-represented in clinical samples and under-represented in non-clinical samples. The present study contrasted two hypotheses about what characterizes clinically significant perfectionism: the two-factor theory and perfectionism/acceptance theory. First, a person-oriented approach by means of cluster analysis was used to identify typical patterns of perfectionism. These clusters were then cross-tabulated with two clinical samples (patients with social phobia and patients with panic disorder) and a non-clinical sample. The results showed that patterns of clinically significant perfectionism combined high Concern over Mistakes (CM) and Doubts about Action (DA) with high Personal Standards (PS) (and to a lesser extent also high Organization)--which is consistent with perfectionism/acceptance theory, but at odds with the two-factor theory. The results illustrate the value of a person-oriented methodological approach as a complement to the traditional variable-oriented approach.},
  author       = {Lundh, Lars-Gunnar and Saboonchi, Fredrik and Wångby, Margit},
  issn         = {0147-5916},
  keyword      = {person-oriented approach,depression,panic disorder,perfectionism,social phobia},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {333--350},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Cognitive Therapy and Research},
  title        = {The role of personal standards in clinically significant perfectionism. A person-oriented approach to the study of patterns of perfectionism},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10608-006-9109-7},
  volume       = {32},
  year         = {2008},
}