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Animal foods, protein, calcium and prostate cancer risk: the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition

Allen, N. E.; Key, T. J.; Appleby, P. N.; Travis, R. C.; Roddam, A. W.; Tjonneland, A.; Johnsen, N. F.; Overvad, K.; Linseisen, J. and Rohrmann, S., et al. (2008) In British Journal of Cancer 98(9). p.1574-1581
Abstract
We examined consumption of animal foods, protein and calcium in relation to risk of prostate cancer among 142 251 men in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Associations were examined using Cox regression, stratified by recruitment centre and adjusted for height, weight, education, marital status and energy intake. After an average of 8.7 years of follow-up, there were 2727 incident cases of prostate cancer, of which 1131 were known to be localised and 541 advanced-stage disease. A high intake of dairy protein was associated with an increased risk, with a hazard ratio for the top versus the bottom fifth of intake of 1.22 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.07-1.41, P-trend = 0.02). After calibration to allow for... (More)
We examined consumption of animal foods, protein and calcium in relation to risk of prostate cancer among 142 251 men in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Associations were examined using Cox regression, stratified by recruitment centre and adjusted for height, weight, education, marital status and energy intake. After an average of 8.7 years of follow-up, there were 2727 incident cases of prostate cancer, of which 1131 were known to be localised and 541 advanced-stage disease. A high intake of dairy protein was associated with an increased risk, with a hazard ratio for the top versus the bottom fifth of intake of 1.22 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.07-1.41, P-trend = 0.02). After calibration to allow for measurement error, we estimated that a 35-g day(-1) increase in consumption of dairy protein was associated with an increase in the risk of prostate cancer of 32% (95% CI: 1-72%, P-trend = 0.04). Calcium from dairy products was also positively associated with risk, but not calcium from other foods. The results support the hypothesis that a high intake of protein or calcium from dairy products may increase the risk for prostate cancer. (Less)
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publication status
published
subject
keywords
EPIC, prospective, calcium, prostate cancer, dairy protein
in
British Journal of Cancer
volume
98
issue
9
pages
1574 - 1581
publisher
Nature Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • wos:000255588000014
  • scopus:43249086197
ISSN
1532-1827
DOI
10.1038/sj.bjc.6604331
language
English
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yes
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8b77ce9e-7941-4f3e-b727-b93a3f49cf05 (old id 1204855)
date added to LUP
2008-09-18 11:27:16
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2017-10-01 03:55:40
@article{8b77ce9e-7941-4f3e-b727-b93a3f49cf05,
  abstract     = {We examined consumption of animal foods, protein and calcium in relation to risk of prostate cancer among 142 251 men in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Associations were examined using Cox regression, stratified by recruitment centre and adjusted for height, weight, education, marital status and energy intake. After an average of 8.7 years of follow-up, there were 2727 incident cases of prostate cancer, of which 1131 were known to be localised and 541 advanced-stage disease. A high intake of dairy protein was associated with an increased risk, with a hazard ratio for the top versus the bottom fifth of intake of 1.22 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.07-1.41, P-trend = 0.02). After calibration to allow for measurement error, we estimated that a 35-g day(-1) increase in consumption of dairy protein was associated with an increase in the risk of prostate cancer of 32% (95% CI: 1-72%, P-trend = 0.04). Calcium from dairy products was also positively associated with risk, but not calcium from other foods. The results support the hypothesis that a high intake of protein or calcium from dairy products may increase the risk for prostate cancer.},
  author       = {Allen, N. E. and Key, T. J. and Appleby, P. N. and Travis, R. C. and Roddam, A. W. and Tjonneland, A. and Johnsen, N. F. and Overvad, K. and Linseisen, J. and Rohrmann, S. and Boeing, H. and Pischon, T. and Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B. and Kiemeney, L. and Tagliabue, G. and Palli, D. and Vineis, P. and Tumino, R. and Trichopoulou, A. and Kassapa, C. and Trichopoulos, D. and Ardanaz, E. and Larranaga, N. and Tormo, M-J and Gonzalez, C. A. and Quiros, J. R. and Sanchez, M-J and Bingham, S. and Khaw, K-T and Manjer, Jonas and Berglund, Göran and Stattin, P. and Hallmans, G. and Slimani, N. and Ferrari, P. and Rinaldi, S. and Riboli, E.},
  issn         = {1532-1827},
  keyword      = {EPIC,prospective,calcium,prostate cancer,dairy protein},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {1574--1581},
  publisher    = {Nature Publishing Group},
  series       = {British Journal of Cancer},
  title        = {Animal foods, protein, calcium and prostate cancer risk: the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.bjc.6604331},
  volume       = {98},
  year         = {2008},
}