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The tyranny of small steps: A reoccurring behaviour in management

Haraldsson, Hördur LU ; Sverdrup, Harald LU ; Belyazid, Salim LU ; Holmqvist, Johan LU and Gramstad, Robin C J (2008) In Systems Research and Behavioral Science 25(1). p.25-43
Abstract
The Tyranny of Small Steps (TYST) behaviour has been investigated. Explained through a systemic perspective, the behaviour TYST is an unwanted change to a system through a series of small activities that may be independent from one another. These activities are small enough not to be detected by the 'surveillance' within the system, but significant enough to encroach upon the 'tolerance zone' of the system and compromise integrity of the system. TYST is an unintentional process that is experienced within the system and made possible by the lack of transparency between an overarching level and a local level where the encroachment is taking place. The Orby case study illustrates a real life manifestation of the TYST behaviour in management... (More)
The Tyranny of Small Steps (TYST) behaviour has been investigated. Explained through a systemic perspective, the behaviour TYST is an unwanted change to a system through a series of small activities that may be independent from one another. These activities are small enough not to be detected by the 'surveillance' within the system, but significant enough to encroach upon the 'tolerance zone' of the system and compromise integrity of the system. TYST is an unintentional process that is experienced within the system and made possible by the lack of transparency between an overarching level and a local level where the encroachment is taking place. The Orby case study illustrates a real life manifestation of the TYST behaviour in management and planning. The TYST illustrates the necessity for total transparency in any systems in order to avoid unintended consequence. The TYST process may be regarded as a part of wide range of complex systems but depending on the conditions, it can remain dormant, and only become active when the conditions for lack of transparency are fulfilled. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
management, archetypes, planning, system dynamics, reoccurring behaviour
in
Systems Research and Behavioral Science
volume
25
issue
1
pages
25 - 43
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • wos:000255307600002
  • scopus:55449102245
ISSN
1099-1743
DOI
10.1002/sres.859
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
25da1b98-426f-4084-b743-d126fa70e274 (old id 1204973)
date added to LUP
2008-09-18 12:50:57
date last changed
2017-08-20 03:36:42
@article{25da1b98-426f-4084-b743-d126fa70e274,
  abstract     = {The Tyranny of Small Steps (TYST) behaviour has been investigated. Explained through a systemic perspective, the behaviour TYST is an unwanted change to a system through a series of small activities that may be independent from one another. These activities are small enough not to be detected by the 'surveillance' within the system, but significant enough to encroach upon the 'tolerance zone' of the system and compromise integrity of the system. TYST is an unintentional process that is experienced within the system and made possible by the lack of transparency between an overarching level and a local level where the encroachment is taking place. The Orby case study illustrates a real life manifestation of the TYST behaviour in management and planning. The TYST illustrates the necessity for total transparency in any systems in order to avoid unintended consequence. The TYST process may be regarded as a part of wide range of complex systems but depending on the conditions, it can remain dormant, and only become active when the conditions for lack of transparency are fulfilled.},
  author       = {Haraldsson, Hördur and Sverdrup, Harald and Belyazid, Salim and Holmqvist, Johan and Gramstad, Robin C J},
  issn         = {1099-1743},
  keyword      = {management,archetypes,planning,system dynamics,reoccurring behaviour},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {25--43},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Systems Research and Behavioral Science},
  title        = {The tyranny of small steps: A reoccurring behaviour in management},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/sres.859},
  volume       = {25},
  year         = {2008},
}