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Acute vestibular neuritis visualized by 3-T magnetic resonance imaging with high-dose gadolinium.

Karlberg, Mikael LU ; Annertz, Mårten LU and Magnusson, Måns LU (2004) In Archives of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery 130(2). p.229-232
Abstract
Sudden idiopathic unilateral loss of vestibular function without other signs or symptoms is called acute vestibular neuritis. It has been suggested that reactivation of human herpes simplex virus 1 could cause vestibular neuritis, Bell palsy, and sudden unilateral hearing loss. Enhancement of the facial nerve on gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a common finding in Bell palsy, but enhancement of the vestibular nerve has never been reported in acute vestibular neuritis. We present 2 consecutive cases of acute vestibular neuritis where high-field-strength MRI (3.0 T) with high-dose (0.3 mmol/kg of body weight) gadolinium–pentetic acid showed isolated enhancement of the vestibular nerve on the affected side only. These... (More)
Sudden idiopathic unilateral loss of vestibular function without other signs or symptoms is called acute vestibular neuritis. It has been suggested that reactivation of human herpes simplex virus 1 could cause vestibular neuritis, Bell palsy, and sudden unilateral hearing loss. Enhancement of the facial nerve on gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a common finding in Bell palsy, but enhancement of the vestibular nerve has never been reported in acute vestibular neuritis. We present 2 consecutive cases of acute vestibular neuritis where high-field-strength MRI (3.0 T) with high-dose (0.3 mmol/kg of body weight) gadolinium–pentetic acid showed isolated enhancement of the vestibular nerve on the affected side only. These findings support the hypothesis of a viral and inflammatory cause of acute vestibular neuritis and might have implications for its treatment. (Less)
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author
organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Archives of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery
volume
130
issue
2
pages
229 - 232
publisher
American Medical Association
external identifiers
  • pmid:14967757
  • wos:000188777300018
  • scopus:0842321747
ISSN
1538-361X
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
4514676c-76d4-4c1d-80b7-56c0b43afdac (old id 120506)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=14967757&dopt=Abstract
http://archotol.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/130/2/229
date added to LUP
2007-07-09 12:42:24
date last changed
2017-06-18 03:43:28
@article{4514676c-76d4-4c1d-80b7-56c0b43afdac,
  abstract     = {Sudden idiopathic unilateral loss of vestibular function without other signs or symptoms is called acute vestibular neuritis. It has been suggested that reactivation of human herpes simplex virus 1 could cause vestibular neuritis, Bell palsy, and sudden unilateral hearing loss. Enhancement of the facial nerve on gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a common finding in Bell palsy, but enhancement of the vestibular nerve has never been reported in acute vestibular neuritis. We present 2 consecutive cases of acute vestibular neuritis where high-field-strength MRI (3.0 T) with high-dose (0.3 mmol/kg of body weight) gadolinium–pentetic acid showed isolated enhancement of the vestibular nerve on the affected side only. These findings support the hypothesis of a viral and inflammatory cause of acute vestibular neuritis and might have implications for its treatment.},
  author       = {Karlberg, Mikael and Annertz, Mårten and Magnusson, Måns},
  issn         = {1538-361X},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {229--232},
  publisher    = {American Medical Association},
  series       = {Archives of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery},
  title        = {Acute vestibular neuritis visualized by 3-T magnetic resonance imaging with high-dose gadolinium.},
  volume       = {130},
  year         = {2004},
}