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(ii) Nerve injuries

Dahlin, Lars LU (2008) In Current Orthopaedics 22(1). p.41533-41533
Abstract
A peripheral nerve can be injured in different ways, varying from a simple nerve compression, a complete transection or laceration and also as traction lesions such as brachial plexus injuries (including avulsion of spinal nerve roots). A thorough history and examination of the patient is crucial to make a correct diagnosis of the lesion, so that the correct treatment can be initiated immediately. Basic knowledge of factors influencing results is essential. for all surgeons dealing with these injuries. The macro- and microanatomy of the nerves, and neurobiological events in neurons and Schwann cells after injury are important when assessing the possibilities for repair and reconstruction of nerve injuries (early and late) and to understand... (More)
A peripheral nerve can be injured in different ways, varying from a simple nerve compression, a complete transection or laceration and also as traction lesions such as brachial plexus injuries (including avulsion of spinal nerve roots). A thorough history and examination of the patient is crucial to make a correct diagnosis of the lesion, so that the correct treatment can be initiated immediately. Basic knowledge of factors influencing results is essential. for all surgeons dealing with these injuries. The macro- and microanatomy of the nerves, and neurobiological events in neurons and Schwann cells after injury are important when assessing the possibilities for repair and reconstruction of nerve injuries (early and late) and to understand the principles for rehabilitation are vital. Focus should also be on the individual patient's ability to cope with the injury. Future research includes pharmacological treatment strategies as an adjunct to surgery. (c) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
neuron, nerve repair, degeneration, nerve injury, nerve regeneration, Schwann cell
in
Current Orthopaedics
volume
22
issue
1
pages
41533 - 41533
publisher
Churchill Livingstone
external identifiers
  • wos:000255367000002
  • scopus:41749113785
ISSN
0268-0890
DOI
10.1016/j.cuor.2008.01.002
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
aaecc8e3-1563-4af3-bd82-a1cf8842f160 (old id 1205321)
date added to LUP
2008-09-18 14:15:22
date last changed
2017-03-26 04:04:18
@article{aaecc8e3-1563-4af3-bd82-a1cf8842f160,
  abstract     = {A peripheral nerve can be injured in different ways, varying from a simple nerve compression, a complete transection or laceration and also as traction lesions such as brachial plexus injuries (including avulsion of spinal nerve roots). A thorough history and examination of the patient is crucial to make a correct diagnosis of the lesion, so that the correct treatment can be initiated immediately. Basic knowledge of factors influencing results is essential. for all surgeons dealing with these injuries. The macro- and microanatomy of the nerves, and neurobiological events in neurons and Schwann cells after injury are important when assessing the possibilities for repair and reconstruction of nerve injuries (early and late) and to understand the principles for rehabilitation are vital. Focus should also be on the individual patient's ability to cope with the injury. Future research includes pharmacological treatment strategies as an adjunct to surgery. (c) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Dahlin, Lars},
  issn         = {0268-0890},
  keyword      = {neuron,nerve repair,degeneration,nerve injury,nerve regeneration,Schwann cell},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {41533--41533},
  publisher    = {Churchill Livingstone},
  series       = {Current Orthopaedics},
  title        = {(ii) Nerve injuries},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cuor.2008.01.002},
  volume       = {22},
  year         = {2008},
}