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The BOADICEA model of genetic susceptibility to breast and ovarian cancers: updates and extensions

Antoniou, A. C.; Cunningham, A. P.; Peto, J.; Evans, D. G.; Lalloo, F.; Narod, S. A.; Risch, H. A.; Eyfjord, J. E.; Hopper, J. L. and Southey, M. C., et al. (2008) In British Journal of Cancer 98(8). p.1457-1466
Abstract
Multiple genetic loci confer susceptibility to breast and ovarian cancers. We have previously developed a model (BOADICEA) under which susceptibility to breast cancer is explained by mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, as well as by the joint multiplicative effects of many genes ( polygenic component). We have now updated BOADICEA using additional family data from two UK population-based studies of breast cancer and family data from BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers identified by 22 population-based studies of breast or ovarian cancer. The combined data set includes 2785 families ( 301 BRCA1 positive and 236 BRCA2 positive). Incidences were smoothed using locally weighted regression techniques to avoid large variations between adjacent intervals. A birth... (More)
Multiple genetic loci confer susceptibility to breast and ovarian cancers. We have previously developed a model (BOADICEA) under which susceptibility to breast cancer is explained by mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, as well as by the joint multiplicative effects of many genes ( polygenic component). We have now updated BOADICEA using additional family data from two UK population-based studies of breast cancer and family data from BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers identified by 22 population-based studies of breast or ovarian cancer. The combined data set includes 2785 families ( 301 BRCA1 positive and 236 BRCA2 positive). Incidences were smoothed using locally weighted regression techniques to avoid large variations between adjacent intervals. A birth cohort effect on the cancer risks was implemented, whereby each individual was assumed to develop cancer according to calendar period-specific incidences. The fitted model predicts that the average breast cancer risks in carriers increase in more recent birth cohorts. For example, the average cumulative breast cancer risk to age 70 years among BRCA1 carriers is 50% for women born in 1920 - 1929 and 58% among women born after 1950. The model was further extended to take into account the risks of male breast, prostate and pancreatic cancer, and to allow for the risk of multiple cancers. BOADICEA can be used to predict carrier probabilities and cancer risks to individuals with any family history, and has been implemented in userfriendly Web-based program(http://www.srl.cam.ac.uk/genepi/boadicea/boadicea_home. html). (Less)
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publication status
published
subject
keywords
cancer risk model, BRCA1, BRCA2, genetic testing
in
British Journal of Cancer
volume
98
issue
8
pages
1457 - 1466
publisher
Nature Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • wos:000255006900022
  • scopus:42149193041
ISSN
1532-1827
DOI
10.1038/sj.bjc.6604305
language
English
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yes
id
a292451e-0c4c-4532-9a2c-dd1cdc68b179 (old id 1206501)
date added to LUP
2008-08-28 15:40:52
date last changed
2017-10-29 03:25:22
@article{a292451e-0c4c-4532-9a2c-dd1cdc68b179,
  abstract     = {Multiple genetic loci confer susceptibility to breast and ovarian cancers. We have previously developed a model (BOADICEA) under which susceptibility to breast cancer is explained by mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, as well as by the joint multiplicative effects of many genes ( polygenic component). We have now updated BOADICEA using additional family data from two UK population-based studies of breast cancer and family data from BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers identified by 22 population-based studies of breast or ovarian cancer. The combined data set includes 2785 families ( 301 BRCA1 positive and 236 BRCA2 positive). Incidences were smoothed using locally weighted regression techniques to avoid large variations between adjacent intervals. A birth cohort effect on the cancer risks was implemented, whereby each individual was assumed to develop cancer according to calendar period-specific incidences. The fitted model predicts that the average breast cancer risks in carriers increase in more recent birth cohorts. For example, the average cumulative breast cancer risk to age 70 years among BRCA1 carriers is 50% for women born in 1920 - 1929 and 58% among women born after 1950. The model was further extended to take into account the risks of male breast, prostate and pancreatic cancer, and to allow for the risk of multiple cancers. BOADICEA can be used to predict carrier probabilities and cancer risks to individuals with any family history, and has been implemented in userfriendly Web-based program(http://www.srl.cam.ac.uk/genepi/boadicea/boadicea_home. html).},
  author       = {Antoniou, A. C. and Cunningham, A. P. and Peto, J. and Evans, D. G. and Lalloo, F. and Narod, S. A. and Risch, H. A. and Eyfjord, J. E. and Hopper, J. L. and Southey, M. C. and Olsson, Håkan and Johannsson, O and Borg, Åke and Passini, B. and Radice, P. and Manoukian, S. and Eccles, D. M. and Tang, N. and Olah, E. and Anton-Culver, H. and Warner, E. and Lubinski, J. and Gronwald, J. and Gorski, B. and Tryggvadottir, L. and Syrjakoski, K. and Kallioniemi, O-P and Eerola, H. and Nevanlinna, H. and Pharoah, P. D. P. and Easton, D. F.},
  issn         = {1532-1827},
  keyword      = {cancer risk model,BRCA1,BRCA2,genetic testing},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {1457--1466},
  publisher    = {Nature Publishing Group},
  series       = {British Journal of Cancer},
  title        = {The BOADICEA model of genetic susceptibility to breast and ovarian cancers: updates and extensions},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.bjc.6604305},
  volume       = {98},
  year         = {2008},
}